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I am developping an Android app, and I need to use java Signature class for data authentication.

On each Android device, I can sign data and verify its signature. However, given a definite chunk of data to sign, a definite modulus, a definite private exponent and a definite public exponent, the outputs of my signatures are different, depending on devices. I did try with bunch of devices, and I obtain the same signatures for Android 3.2 and 3.2.1, but a differents for an Android 2.2.x device.

I compute these signature from constant fields that I generated previously using a KeyFactory with RSA in a java project. The keysize is 2048bit.

Here is a quote of the code that I use to invoque Signature and Verification.

public byte[] signData(byte[] data, PrivateKey privateKey) throws ... {
        Signature signature = Signature.getInstance("SHA256withRSA");
        signature.initSign(privateKey);
        signature.update(data);
        return signature.sign();
}

public boolean verifyData(byte[] data, byte[] sigBytes, PublicKey publicKey) throws ... {
        Signature signature = Signature.getInstance("SHA256withRSA");
        signature.initVerify(publicKey);
        signature.update(data);
        return signature.verify(sigBytes);
}

If I am not mistaking, the signature using SHA256 with RSA is deterministic. Then how can I explain such a behaviour? Another interesting question, how could I make that work cross-devices, i.e. the signatures would be same, no mather which device I use?

Thank you in advance, Franck!

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The code looks right, although pasting the error handlers was hardly necessary. Make sure the key and the data to be signed are the same. –  Seva Alekseyev Jun 28 '12 at 19:03
    
@SevaAlekseyev Yes, I am sure all the inputs of my system are the same. I hard coded them as static final, in a class, containing these constants. I did not link the constant values by convenience. –  franckysnow Jun 28 '12 at 19:07
    
Debug step by step. First, calculate SHA256 hashes on all those platforms, and compare those. –  Seva Alekseyev Jun 28 '12 at 19:11
    
@SevaAlekseyev The SHA256 are the same. But how could I debug the Signature java-class ? RSA encryption and decryption work, but not signature. –  franckysnow Jun 28 '12 at 21:16

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Yes, SHA256withRSA is completely deterministic.

In theory you could be affected by a bug (see an example) in an old modified BouncyCastle library version found on one of the Android versions. Such a bug might be eliminated if you used SHA512withRSA instead, well, at least the referenced one would be.

However, before you start digging into the hash algorithm, check close to home.

Maybe you have obtained your byte array through a call to String.getBytes. This call depends on the default platform encoding which is different between Android 2.2 and Android 2.3. This implies that while your strings are the same in both cases, the byte arrays might not be.

To get encoding under control, and make your code platform independent, specify encoding as a parameter:

plainText.getBytes("UTF-8")

Failing this, there are a few more tactics to get a platform independent implementation.

  • wait until 2.2 with the presumably buggy library dies out
  • distribute a known good library (jar) with your software. If that would be BouncyCastle, you will have problems making sure that your and not Android's classes are loaded. The solution is called SpongyCastle.
  • play with alignment/padding. Try to make the message length in bytes to be congruent with 0,55, 56 or 63 modulo 64 by adding your own fixed padding and hope that one of these options will start giving portable signatures. These values are chosen to interact with the outermost part of the suspect algorithm which is padding to 512 bit blocks.
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your answer Jirka. I changed SHA256withRSA to SHA512withRSA, but it has not fixed the issue. I still have the same signature for a 3.2.1 and 3.2 android devices, and the emulator (2.1) still gets a different signature. The input is not a String but a hardcoded byte[]. Any other idea by any chance? –  franckysnow Jun 28 '12 at 22:50
    
I also get the same output as for 3.2.1 and 3.2 with an emulated 4.0.3 device. –  franckysnow Jun 28 '12 at 23:02
1  
@FranckStudiesCommEng - answer expanded by three routes I'd consider next. –  Jirka Hanika Jun 29 '12 at 6:31
    
Thank you Jirka, loading SpongyCastle made it work on both android 2.2 and 3.x/4.x!!!!!!! :-) –  franckysnow Jun 30 '12 at 10:51

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