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I have tried to go through the jungle (really, PayPal, why don't you weed it out...) for a few days now to find the solution to my pretty simple problem.

I have a website with membership subscriptions. The customer signs up with their email and password on my site. Then they go to PayPal to pay their subscription.

My problem is how do I pass on the key - their email - through the whole transaction so I know who the payment is for?

This because it is likely to happen that they sometimes sign up with one email and pay with another. And how to do it all with a (safe) encrypted button.

What I figured is that I could make the encrypted button on the PayPal "Create PayPal payment button" page.

In Step 3, Add (x-ed out real url) advanced variables:

notify_url=http://xxxxxxxxxx.com/xxxxx.php
test_ipn=1

Get the code:

<form action="https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr" method="post">
<input type="hidden" name="cmd" value="_s-xclick">
<input type="hidden" name="hosted_button_id" value="N6UMVCMXSWMYG">
<input type="image" src="https://www.paypalobjects.com/en_US/i/btn/btn_buynowCC_LG.gif" border="0" name="submit" alt="PayPal - The safer, easier way to pay online!">
<img alt="" border="0" src="https://www.paypalobjects.com/en_US/i/scr/pixel.gif" width="1" height="1">
</form>

and paste the given code into my php page, but add a hidden field named "custom" and give it the email at hand and change the form action to go to the sandbox.

Sort of like this:

<form action="https://www.sandbox.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr" method="post">

<input type="hidden" name="custom" value="<?=$signUpEmail ?>">

<input type="hidden" name="cmd" value="_s-xclick">
<input type="hidden" name="hosted_button_id" value="N6UMVCMXSWMYG">
<input type="image" src="https://www.paypalobjects.com/en_US/i/btn/btn_buynowCC_LG.gif" border="0" name="submit" alt="PayPal - The safer, easier way to pay online!">
<img alt="" border="0" src="https://www.paypalobjects.com/en_US/i/scr/pixel.gif" width="1" height="1">
</form>

This custom variable I can later pick up on my ipn page so I know who the membership is for..

Am I thinking right? Or should I do the button with "handwritten" code? Or is there some better way?

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3 Answers 3

There is a field you can use in the Paypal form to put whatever you want. The name of the filed is "custom". So you can write something like:

<input name="custom" value="blablabla" type="hidden">

I suggest to encode the value of custom value. For example some sort of base64_encode could be useful to discourage curious people. However, there is also a good explanation of what you can do with Paypal in the manual. This link and this one are an excerpt.

Moreover, as suggested in the comments, it is not possible to use session variable related to your frontend in the backoff communication between your site and paypal.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

Above way works, although I had some problems with the PayPal Sandbox not accepting the "Regular PayPal" hosted_button_id - something that was dealt with by re-creating a hosted_button_id in the Sandbox.

<input type="hidden" name="hosted_button_id" value="RECREATENEWINPAYPALSANDBOX">
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Why don't you save that email address in a session variable using $_SESSION['someonesemail'] = "thatsafancyemail@somedomain.org" or whatever abstraction is provided by any framework you might use? That way you're not dependant on PayPal for providing that information. That way, in the off-chance PayPal sends back a response without your customer's email address, you won't be screwed.

The session remains valid for as long as the timeout you set for it, or until the user ends the session, for instance by closing the browser. Your session variables will remain valid for that time as well, even if the user leaves your website to go through the PayPal payment process.

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The problem is that I still won't know then who payed for what. –  Paul Jun 29 '12 at 0:23
    
The problem is that I still won't know then who payed for what. In the event that a user joins with one email address and pays with another that is connected to their PayPal account, or if they pay by card, I apparently need to know what user account is paid for. That is what the custom variable is for. –  Paul Jun 29 '12 at 0:31
    
I don't see the problem :) When you go through the payment flow with paypal, you get a response in the end telling you if the payment was processed succesfully or not. At that time, you recover the email you saved to a session var previously, and fetch the account it is linked to from the database and tell it, it's valid. –  DandyDev Jul 1 '12 at 11:00
3  
In PayPal IPN it's not possible to recover any session variable since it's dealt with off-browser, back-end, server to server. What you are talking about would be possible with PayPal PDT, but that is a very uncertain way of dealing with it since the customer might not click on the back to site link or close the browser (so it's never triggered). –  Paul Jul 1 '12 at 19:15
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