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What is the regex to allow dashes and numbers only?

A good example is use in a phone number. e.g. 555-555-555, 12-2314-425.

I don't want entries like: ------------- though but -34--53-343 is fine for now.

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RegEx doesn't have memory, you cannot guarantee a number will be present among dashes if all the spots can be taken up by either one. –  TheZ Jun 28 '12 at 19:14
1  
@TheZ Ruby and other dynamic language regexp's certainly "have memory" as they support backreferences. One doesn't need "memory" to make a regex match this question's desired behavior, see my answer below. –  dbenhur Jun 28 '12 at 20:44

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

So in the problem as stated, you want at least one digit but otherwise any of 0-9 or dash.

/^[\d-]*\d[\d-]*$/

%w{555-555-555 12-2314-425 -34--53-343 -------------}.each{|s| puts "#{s} #{s.match(/^[\d-]*\d[\d-]*$/) ? 'does' : 'does not'} match"}

555-555-555 does match
12-2314-425 does match
-34--53-343 does match
------------- does not match

If you're trying to recognize phone numbers, you probably want something that recognizes sequences of digits optionally separated by single dashes, try this instead:

/^\d+(?:-\d+)*$/

Which excludes leading or trailing dashes and doubled dashes.

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+1: Deleted my answer, realized it was the same as this except you used \d. Here's a link to see your's working. –  Windle Jun 28 '12 at 19:24
    
Well if they decide not to use dashes that's fine too. I guess a more accurate way to say it is, they can only have numbers or dashes present. –  LearningRoR Jun 28 '12 at 19:33

Don't know ruby, but I assume the regex is:

/^[0-9]([0-9]|-(?!-))+$/
  1. Start with a number,
  2. Followed by either a number, or a dash not preceded by a dash. Multiple times possible (555-54-456 is valid, 555--54-456 is not)
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One of his example acceptable strings starts with a dash. –  dbenhur Jun 28 '12 at 19:23
    
Yep, but I assumed with 'fine for now' I assumed the OP meant: 'would be nice to catch to, but not yet strictly necessary at this point'. As these are telephone numbers, do you see a use for a starting dash, or a repeated dash? I tried to answer with telephone numbers in mind rather then the abstract case. –  Wrikken Jun 28 '12 at 19:29

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