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I want to create a Dictionary that maps a Type to an Action, but I want the keys to be types that come from a specific parent class. So I want to do something like:

class Container
{
    private Dictionary<Type, Action> dict;

    public void AddAction(Type t, Action a) where t : typeof(SomeParentClass)
    {
        dict[t] = a;
    }
}

Where the AddAction method only accepts values of t that are types of classes that are subclasses of some specific class. I've seen something like this done in Java with the extends keyword, but I can't figure out how to do this in C#, if it's even possible.

Edit: To clarify, I don't want the AddAction method to take an instance of SomeParentClass, but rather the Type of a class that is a subclass of SomeParentClass. Is there maybe a better way than using Types?

Edit: What I'm essentially trying to do is create a dispatching service, wherein various parts of the app can register interest in an Event type and provide an Action that is called when an event of that type is fired. So imagine something like

service.RegisterInterest(typeof(MyEvent), myAction)

Where myAction is of type Action<MyEvent> (something I didn't put in the original post but should have instead of a plain Action).

Then some other part of the app can do

service.TriggerEvent(typeof(MyEvent))

Which causes all Action<MyEvent> instances registered as above to be called...So in fact that Dictionary maps a Type to a List<Action<Event>>, not a single Action.

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If you show us how you're using it, we may be able to come up with more appropriate solutions –  Paul Phillips Jun 28 '12 at 19:59
    
I updated my post to provide some more details. –  toasteroven Jun 28 '12 at 20:48
    
With those new details, it seems like you want compile-time checking. I think this makes the first part of Lee's answer perfect for you. You would just type RegisterInterest<MyEvent>(myAction) and TriggerEvent<MyEvent>() then. –  Paul Phillips Jun 28 '12 at 20:53
    
It's getting there, but now I'm having trouble making it take an Action<T> instead of a plain Action...the Dictionary needs to hold a List<Action<Event>>, but it seems I can't call RegisterInterest with an instance of Action<MyEvent>. Is this a covariance thing that C# (at least 3.5) just can't do? –  toasteroven Jun 28 '12 at 21:02
    
Try casting it to Action<Event> when you put it on the list. Then, when triggering, you can cast it back to Action<MyEvent> because you do know what type it is (the key of the dictionary entry, also the type parameter to Trigger). Since it's internal like that, it's a perfectly fine use of casting. –  Paul Phillips Jun 28 '12 at 21:07

4 Answers 4

Instead of Type t, use SomeParentClass t as param

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If you require compile-time checking you can use generics:

public void AddAction<T>(Action a) where T : SomeParentClass
{
    dict[typeof(T)] = a;
}

You may also want to keep the non-generic version

public void AddAction(Type t, Action a)
{
    if(! typeof(SomeClass).IsAssignableFrom(t)) throw new ArgumentException();
    dict[t] = a;
}
share|improve this answer

I'd go with something like this:

class Container
{
    private Dictionary<Type, Action> dict;

    public bool AddAction(Type t, Action a) 
    {
        if (typeof(SomeParentClass).IsAssignableFrom(t))
        { 
            dict[t] = a;
            return true;
        }
        return false;
    }
}
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1  
I think t and typeof(SomeParentClass) need to be swapped in the if-statement. –  Austin Salonen Jun 28 '12 at 20:09
    
Yep... looks like you're right. –  spender Jun 28 '12 at 20:13

Add assertion to the method.

Debug.Assert(t.IsAssignableFrom(typeof(SomeParentClass)));
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