Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a function that saves cookies

    cookievalue= escape(document.passwordCheck.oldPassword.value) + ";";
    document.cookie="oldCookie=" + cookievalue
    cookievalue= escape(document.passwordCheck.oldPassword.value) + ";";
    document.cookie="newCookie=" + cookievalue

How do I retrieve the data for oldCookie and newCookie?

share|improve this question
1  
Have you ever tried to search for solution? –  VisioN Jun 28 '12 at 19:48
    
Duplicate: stackoverflow.com/questions/4003823/… –  Jonathan Lonowski Jun 28 '12 at 19:49
1  
You should not store passwords in cookies. –  Bergi Jun 28 '12 at 19:57

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

From http://www.w3schools.com/js/js_cookies.asp:

function getCookie(c_name) {
    var i,x,y,ARRcookies=document.cookie.split(";");
    for (i=0;i<ARRcookies.length;i++) {
        x=ARRcookies[i].substr(0,ARRcookies[i].indexOf("="));
        y=ARRcookies[i].substr(ARRcookies[i].indexOf("=")+1);
        x=x.replace(/^\s+|\s+$/g,"");
        if (x==c_name) {
            return unescape(y);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

The function of W3CSchool is wrong. It fails if there are multiple cookies that have the same suffix like:

ffoo=bar; foo=baz

When you search for foo it will return the value of ffoo instead of foo.

Now here is what I would do: First of all, you need get to know the syntax of how cookies are transported. Netscape’s original specification (there are only copies available like this one at haxx.se) uses semicolons to separate multiple cookies while each name/value pair has the following syntax:

NAME=VALUE
This string is a sequence of characters excluding semi-colon, comma and white space. If there is a need to place such data in the name or value, some encoding method such as URL style %XX encoding is recommended, though no encoding is defined or required.

So splitting document.cookie string at semi-colons or commas is a viable option.

Besides that, RFC 2109 does also specify that cookies are separated by either semi-colons or commas:

cookie          =       "Cookie:" cookie-version
                        1*((";" | ",") cookie-value)
cookie-value    =       NAME "=" VALUE [";" path] [";" domain]
cookie-version  =       "$Version" "=" value
NAME            =       attr
VALUE           =       value
path            =       "$Path" "=" value
domain          =       "$Domain" "=" value

Although both are allowed, commas are preferred as they are the default separator of list items in HTTP.

Note: For backward compatibility, the separator in the Cookie header is semi-colon (;) everywhere. A server should also accept comma (,) as the separator between cookie-values for future compatibility.

Furthermore, the name/value pair has some further restrictions as the VALUE can also be a quoted string as specified in RFC 2616:

attr        =     token
value       =     token | quoted-string

So these two cookie versions need to be treated separately:

if (typeof String.prototype.trimLeft !== "function") {
    String.prototype.trimLeft = function() {
        return this.replace(/^\s+/, "");
    };
}
if (typeof String.prototype.trimRight !== "function") {
    String.prototype.trimRight = function() {
        return this.replace(/\s+$/, "");
    };
}
if (typeof Array.prototype.map !== "function") {
    Array.prototype.map = function(callback, thisArg) {
        for (var i=0, n=this.length, a=[]; i<n; i++) {
            if (i in this) a[i] = callback.call(thisArg, this[i]);
        }
        return a;
    };
}
function getCookies() {
    var c = document.cookie, v = 0, cookies = {};
    if (document.cookie.match(/^\s*\$Version=(?:"1"|1);\s*(.*)/)) {
        c = RegExp.$1;
        v = 1;
    }
    if (v === 0) {
        c.split(/[,;]/).map(function(cookie) {
            var parts = cookie.split(/=/, 2),
                name = decodeURIComponent(parts[0].trimLeft()),
                value = parts.length > 1 ? decodeURIComponent(parts[1].trimRight()) : null;
            cookies[name] = value;
        });
    } else {
        c.match(/(?:^|\s+)([!#$%&'*+\-.0-9A-Z^`a-z|~]+)=([!#$%&'*+\-.0-9A-Z^`a-z|~]*|"(?:[\x20-\x7E\x80\xFF]|\\[\x00-\x7F])*")(?=\s*[,;]|$)/g).map(function($0, $1) {
            var name = $0,
                value = $1.charAt(0) === '"'
                          ? $1.substr(1, -1).replace(/\\(.)/g, "$1")
                          : $1;
            cookies[name] = value;
        });
    }
    return cookies;
}
function getCookie(name) {
    return getCookies()[name];
}

Sourced from: http://stackoverflow.com/a/4004010

share|improve this answer
1  
Very good point on the commas and semicolons. You win. :) –  tjg184 Jun 28 '12 at 19:49
1  
Let the credits go the original author! :) –  Praveen Kumar Jun 28 '12 at 19:50
3  
Sourced or not, you shouldn't rip other answers. If a question is a duplicate, link to the existing question in a comment. –  Jonathan Lonowski Jun 28 '12 at 19:53
    
@JonathanLonowski Sure... :) Will follow from next! :) –  Praveen Kumar Jun 28 '12 at 19:56

Use a cookie library or other function to get value.

http://www.java2s.com/Code/JavaScript/Development/Cookiesetdeletegetvalueandcreate.htm

function getCookieVal (offset) {
  var endstr = document.cookie.indexOf (";", offset);
  if (endstr == -1) { endstr = document.cookie.length; }
  return unescape(document.cookie.substring(offset, endstr));
}

function getCookie (name) {
  var arg = name + "=";
  var alen = arg.length;
  var clen = document.cookie.length;
  var i = 0;
  while (i < clen) {
    var j = i + alen;
    if (document.cookie.substring(i, j) == arg) {
      return getCookieVal (j);
      }
    i = document.cookie.indexOf(" ", i) + 1;
    if (i == 0) break; 
    }
     return null;
  }
share|improve this answer
    
You shouldn't start a non-constructor function name with a capital letter –  Lapple Jun 28 '12 at 19:49
    
Fixed. I copied the code. :( –  tjg184 Jun 28 '12 at 19:50

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.