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Let's say an Order has many Line items and we're storing the total cost of an order (based on the sum of prices on order lines) in the orders table.

--------------
orders
--------------
id
ref
total_cost
--------------

--------------
lines
--------------
id
order_id
price
--------------

In a simple application, the order and line are created during the same step of the checkout process. So this means

INSERT INTO orders .... 

-- Get ID of inserted order record
INSERT into lines VALUES(null, order_id, ...), ...

where we get the order ID after creating the order record.

The problem I'm having is trying to figure out the best way to store the total cost of an order. I don't want to have to

  1. create an order
  2. create lines on an order
  3. calculate cost on order based on lines then update record created in 1. in orders table

This would mean a nullable total_cost field on orders for starters...

My solution thus far is to have an order_totals table with a 1:1 relationship to the orders table. But I think it's redundant. Ideally, since everything required to calculate total costs (lines on an order) is in the database, I would work out the value every time I need it, but this is very expensive.

What are your thoughts?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I will echo the other answers and say that, unless it's unacceptably expensive to do so, I'd calculate the total cost from the lines table as-and-when required.

Alternatively, one could define triggers that update orders.total_cost as appropriate. However, one would need to define triggers after INSERT, UPDATE and DELETE on lines:

CREATE TRIGGER after_insert_lines AFTER INSERT ON lines FOR EACH ROW
  UPDATE orders SET total_cost = total_cost + NEW.price;

CREATE TRIGGER after_update_lines AFTER UPDATE ON lines FOR EACH ROW
  UPDATE orders SET total_cost = total_cost - OLD.price + NEW.price;

CREATE TRIGGER after_delete_lines AFTER DELETE ON lines FOR EACH ROW
  UPDATE orders SET total_cost = total_cost - OLD.price;
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Absolutely, if you store aggregated data, you must have triggers to make sure it always stays correct. It is a very poor choice to depend on an application for this as data can be changed many ways. –  HLGEM Jun 28 '12 at 21:37
    
Triggers are an interesting option, thanks. –  damian86 Jul 1 '12 at 22:26

I think it's better to not have a order total column or table.

Just calculate the order total by summing the Line records whenever you need to display them. Imagine if the line records change then you will have to constantly maintain either another column or table to update the total price of the order.

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The table is not needed as it can be stored as a column of the orders table.

Whether it is worth storing it as a new column depends on the number of times you will be reading the values vs changes made (and the cost of calculation).

If it's read a lot but not changed very often and it takes an unacceptable amount of time to calculate it will be worth maintaining a new total column. Otherwise you are better off calculating it each time, maybe through a view so you don't have to code in the calculation everywhere its selected.

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I agree with other commenters that, unless it's unusually expensive resource-wise to calculate the total cost over the line items, you're best doing that on the fly with a SUM/GROUP BY query.

But if you still want to go with the upfront total cost calculation, just calculate it in memory before you start running your SQL inserts. After all, you have the data to insert into the line items, so just iterate over them and sum up the total cost first, and then create the order record with the total cost. Follow that with the line item insertions.

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As others have suggested, it's probably better to calculate the sum on the fly.

I'd just like to add that InnoDB clusters its tables, so if you pick the PK on lines correctly, the lines of the same order will be stored physically close together and you'll be able calculate the sum for the whole order with minimal I/O (i.e. very rapidly).

To do that, abandon the surrogate PK in lines and use the natural PK: {order_id, line_no}.

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