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i have a binary file which has 4 KB of header information and then 28 bytes of data and then 24 byte which i want to read. How can i loop every 24 and 28 bytes and read(or extract) every first 8 bytes of data of those 28 and 24 bytes.. In python i did something like this. Not sure how to do for variable length

import sys
import struct
f = open(sys.argv[1],"rb")
f.seek(4096)
byte = f.read(28)
while byte != "":   
    ticks = struct.unpack("<ll",byte[:8]) #not sure how to read 8 bytes 
    byte = f.read(28)
f.close()

Here is what it looks like after the header.

Length
(bytes) Field Name
8   TS_INCR
4   SEQID
2   OP
2   LUN
4   NBLKS
8   LBA


Length
(bytes) Field Name
8   TS_INCR
4   SEQID
2   OP
2   LUN
4   LATENCY_TICKS
2   HOST_ID
2   HOST_LUN

If you guys can help with this please. Python or PERL does not matter. Thanks!!!!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The Endianness of the data you are reading matters here. You seem to be unpacking the 8 octets as two longs stored in little endian order. Are you sure it is not a single 64-bit quantity (which would make the q or Q formats more appropriate)? Unfortunately, I am on 32-bit machine so my perl does not support Q.

However, the following should point you in the right direction:

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict; use warnings;
use autodie;

use Fcntl qw(:seek);
use List::Util qw( sum );

my ($input_file) = @ARGV;
die "Need input file\n" unless defined $input_file;

my $HEADER_SIZE = 4_096;

my @typedef = (
    {
        fields => [
            qw(
                TS_INCR_LO
                TS_INCR_HI
                SEQID
                OP
                LUN
                NBLKS
                LBA_LO
                LBA_HI
            )
        ],
        tmpl => 'LLLSSLLL',
        start => 0,
        size => 28,
    },
    {
        fields => [
            qw(
                TS_INCR_LO
                TS_INCR_HI
                SEQID
                OP
                LUN
                LATENCY_TICKS
                HOST_ID
                HOST_LUN
            )
        ],
        tmpl => 'LLLSSLSS',
        start => 28,
        size => 24,
    },
);

open my $input, '<:raw', $input_file;

seek $input, $HEADER_SIZE, SEEK_SET;

my $BLOCK_SIZE = sum map $_->{size}, @typedef;
read $input, my($buffer), $BLOCK_SIZE;

my @structs;

for my $t ( @typedef ) {
    my %struct;
    @struct{ @{ $t->{fields}} } = unpack(
        $t->{tmpl},
        substr($buffer, $t->{start}, $t->{size})
    );
    push @structs, \%struct;
}

use Data::Dumper;
print Dumper \@structs;
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Sorry I am not good at perl. Is this program reading first 8 bytes of those 28 and 24 bytes? –  user1489813 Jun 29 '12 at 15:17
    
It is unpacking the entire structure into Perl hashes. TS_INCR_LO is the first four octets in each block, and TS_INCR_HI is the second set of four octets that make up TS_INCR. You'll need to combine the two. –  Sinan Ünür Jun 29 '12 at 15:30
    
I am using 64-bit machine. So if i use 'Q'. I don't have to do that, right? like tmpl=> 'QLSSLQ'? –  user1489813 Jun 29 '12 at 16:22
    
Yup. And instead of the *_LO and *_HI, you use a single field. HTH. –  Sinan Ünür Jun 29 '12 at 16:46

I think I'd read 52 bytes per loop (24+28==52) and simply index into the bytes you care about. It'd look something like this:

byte = f.read(52)
while byte != "":   
    ticks = struct.unpack("<ll",byte[0:8])
    tocks = struct.unpack("<ll",byte[28:36])
    byte = f.read(52)

Note that I do not know if while byte != "" is an idiomatic loop for this case. I'm simply suggesting reading in larger chunks and only parsing the bytes you're interested in. OS-level read() operations are extremely slow and cutting them in half will roughly double the speed of your application. You could definitely get even larger speedups if you change to reading much larger blocks of data -- but that may require more rewriting than this tiny change.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the quick reply. I did 'Q' instead of 'll'.this is the first output but what does 'L' at the end mean==> (7205759403792853089L,) –  user1489813 Jun 29 '12 at 13:28
    
L means it is of type long. –  sarnold Jun 29 '12 at 22:05

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