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The server returns the HTTP headers and binary file; something like this:

HTTP/1.1 200 OK
Date: Thu, 28 Jun 2012 22:11:14 GMT
Server: Apache/2.2.3 (Red Hat)
Set-Cookie: JSESSIONID=blabla; Path=/
Pragma: no-cache
Cache-Control: must-revalidate, no-store
Expires: Thu, 01 Jan 1970 00:00:00 GMT
Content-disposition: inline; filename="foo.pdf"
Content-Length: 6231119
Connection: close
Content-Type: application/pdf

%PDF-1.6
%âãÏÓ
5989 0 obj
<</Linearized 1/L 6231119/O 5992/E 371504/N 1498/T 6111290/H [ 55176 6052]>>
endobj

xref
5989 2744
0000000016 00000 n
0000061228 00000 n
0000061378 00000 n

I want to copy only the binary file. But how to know when the headers part is ended? I tried check check if the line contains a \r\n\r\n but looks like this standard does not applies to server response, only to client. This given:

Content-disposition: inline; filename="foo.pdf"
Content-Length: 6231119
Connection: close
Content-Type: application/pdf

%PDF-1.6
%âãÏÓ
5989 0 obj
<</Linearized 1/L 6231119/O 5992/E 371504/N 1498/T 6111290/H [ 55176 6052]>>
endobj

xref
5989 2744
0000000016 00000 n

Here is the C Code:

while((readed = recv(sock, buffer, 128, 0)) > 0) {

    if(isnheader == 0 && strstr(buffer, "\r\n\r\n") != NULL)
        isnheader = 1;

        if(isnheader) 
          fwrite(buffer, 1, readed, fp);
}

UPDATE:

I put a continue control into my if-statement:

if(isnheader == 0 && strstr(buffer, "\r\n\r\n") != NULL) {
    isnheader = 1;
    continue;
}

Well, it works as expected. But as @Alnitak have mentioned, it's not safe.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You are not parsing your input correctly. Here are a couple of things you are doing incorrectly:

  • Your code seems to imply that your buffer will contain at most, one line of header data. However recv() does not operate on "lines" of data, but on blocks of binary data. So if you tell it that your buffer is 128 bytes in length, it will attempt to fill your buffer with 128 bytes of data if it is available (even if the 128 bytes of data contain multiple "lines").
  • Your code does not take into consideration that the "\r\n" of the header break might be pulled into your buffer by two different calls to recv() which would prevent your code from recognizing the header break.
  • If you do find the header break (which may happen if size of the headers is just right), you will end up pushing the last header with the terminating "\r\n" and the header break ("\r\n") into your binary data copy.

I've written a quick function which should find the end of the HTTP headers and write the rest of the server's response to a file stream:

void parse_http_headers(int s, FILE * fp)
{
   int       isnheader;
   ssize_t   readed;
   size_t    len;
   size_t    offset;
   size_t    pos;
   char      buffer[1024];
   char    * eol; // end of line
   char    * bol; // beginning of line

   isnheader = 0;
   len       = 0;

   // read next chunk from socket
   while((readed = read(s, &buffer[len], (1023-len))) > 0)
   {
      // write rest of data to FILE stream
      if (isnheader != 0)
         fwrite(buffer, 1, readed, fp);

      // process headers
      if (isnheader == 0)
      {
         // calculate combined length of unprocessed data and new data
         len += readed;

         // NULL terminate buffer for string functions
         buffer[len] = '\0';

         // checks if the header break happened to be the first line of the
         // buffer
         if (!(strncmp(buffer, "\r\n", 2)))
         {
            if (len > 2)
               fwrite(buffer, 1, (len-2), fp);
            continue;
         };
         if (!(strncmp(buffer, "\n", 1)))
         {
            if (len > 1)
               fwrite(buffer, 1, (len-1), fp);
            continue;
         };

         // process each line in buffer looking for header break
         bol = buffer;
         while((eol = index(bol, '\n')) != NULL)
         {
            // update bol based upon the value of eol
            bol = eol + 1; 

            // test if end of headers has been reached
            if ( (!(strncmp(bol, "\r\n", 2))) || (!(strncmp(bol, "\n", 1))) )
            {
               // note that end of headers has been reached
               isnheader = 1;

               // update the value of bol to reflect the beginning of the line
               // immediately after the headers
               if (bol[0] != '\n')
                  bol += 1;
               bol += 1;

               // calculate the amount of data remaining in the buffer
               len = len - (bol - buffer);

               // write remaining data to FILE stream
               if (len > 0)
                  fwrite(bol, 1, len, fp);

               // reset length of left over data to zero and continue processing
               // non-header information
               len = 0;
            };
         };

         if (isnheader == 0)
         { 
            // shift data remaining in buffer to beginning of buffer
            offset = (bol - buffer);
            for(pos = 0; pos < offset; pos++)
               buffer[pos] = buffer[offset + pos];

            // save amount of unprocessed data remaining in buffer
            len = offset;
         };
      };
   };

   return;
}

I've not tested the code, so it may have simple errors, however it should point you in the correct direction for parsing string data from a buffer in C.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks so much for your answer. I tried it, but I'm saving 0 bytes. :( –  Jack Jun 30 '12 at 1:32
    
@Jack I've just finished testing the example in a test program. I made a few tweaks to properly shift the buffered data, switched to using read() and index(), and updated the code to work with both '\r\n' and '\n' line terminations. –  David M. Syzdek Jun 30 '12 at 4:50
    
Thanks very much. That works fine :) –  Jack Jun 30 '12 at 16:17

The header and the body are supposed to be separated by \r\n\r\n (section 4.1 of RFC 2616)

However some servers might omit the \r and only send \n lines, particularly if they fail to sanitise any CGI supplied headers to ensure that they include the \r.

You also need to consider how you're chunking your reads - it's perfectly possible that the separator might span your 128 byte chunks, which will stop the strstr call from working.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer! But I still have no idea how to filter by C code. You made me think of it, mainly because strstr() is not good to check for it and the size, I'd choosed 128 because it normally is the length of one line in some files. –  Jack Jun 28 '12 at 23:18

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