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If I want to use C++11's regular expressions with unicode strings, will they work with char* as UTF-8 or do I have to convert them to a wchar_t* string?

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6  
Do I detect a confusion about Unicode/code points and the encoding schemes of Unicode here? – Maarten Bodewes Jun 28 '12 at 23:50
1  
up vote 8 down vote accepted

You would need to test your compiler and the system you are using, but in theory, it will be supported if your system has a UTF-8 locale. The following test returned true for me on Clang/OS X.

bool test_unicode()
{
    std::locale old;
    std::locale::global(std::locale("en_US.UTF-8"));

    std::regex pattern("[[:alpha:]]+", std::regex_constants::extended);
    bool result = std::regex_match(std::string("abcdéfg"), pattern);

    std::locale::global(old);

    return result;
}

NOTE: This was compiled in a file what was UTF-8 encoded.


Just to be safe I also used a string with the explicit hex versions. It worked also.

bool test_unicode2()
{
    std::locale old;
    std::locale::global(std::locale("en_US.UTF-8"));

    std::regex pattern("[[:alpha:]]+", std::regex_constants::extended);
    bool result = std::regex_match(std::string("abcd\xC3\xA9""fg"), pattern);

    std::locale::global(old);

    return result;
}
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2  
You don't need to save the source code in UTF-8 if you use u8"abcdéfg". – R. Martinho Fernandes Jun 29 '12 at 7:51
    
Is locale so important? If you ignore locale at all? – Viet Nov 10 '12 at 11:32
1  
@Viet There is always a locale. If you don't explicitly set the locale you need, then regex will process with the preexisting locale. I would not expect the regex to to work with UTF-8 strings if the locale is not compatible with UTF-8. – Jeffery Thomas Nov 11 '12 at 18:14
    
@Jeffery Thomas: Thanks. I googled a bit and found that this is applicable to Windows as well. – Viet Nov 12 '12 at 1:54
    
"abcd\0xC3\0xA9fg" is a string with two embedded null bytes. What you want is probably "abcd\xC3\xA9""fg". Now, I tried this with clang on my Linux box and it quite clearly doesn't work :( gist.github.com/rmartinho/5349044 – R. Martinho Fernandes Apr 9 '13 at 20:38

C++11 regular expressions will "work with" UTF-8 just fine, for a minimal definition of "work". If you want "complete" Unicode regular expression support for UTF-8 strings, you will be better off with a library that supports that directly such as http://www.pcre.org/ .

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1  
Or Boost.Regex. – ildjarn Jun 29 '12 at 1:22
2  
@ildjarn: ...which needs ICU support compiled in, which unfortunately is not the rule on all platforms, and can be quite a b**** to get to work. ICU, however, has RegEx support of its own... – DevSolar Apr 9 '13 at 11:15

Yes they will, this is by design of the UTF-8 encoding. Substring operations should work correctly if the string is treated as an array of bytes rather than an array of codepoints.

See FAQ #18 here: http://www.utf8everywhere.org/#faq.validation about how this is achieved in this encoding's design.

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1  
Regex matching is not a "substring operation". – R. Martinho Fernandes Apr 9 '13 at 20:04

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