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I have a query that's used in a bowling center to sort all the best averages in descending order.

Everything works well, except that if a player plays in two different leagues (or when I don't group by season since the averages reset after each season), I only want the best average of the given player since I don't want duplicates. (Averages in different leagues for the same player don't accumulate, so a player can have more than one average)

I thought I had solved that problem a while ago after asking on Stack Overflow (here), but recently, I was told that sometimes, there are some problems with the query, which I don't know how I didn't notice earlier.

The problem is that even though I don't get duplicate names and I get the correct MAX average, the other columns, such as the leagueName, the number of games played and the season aren't always correct if a player plays in multiple league. Here's the query:

SELECT  PlayerID, Name, max(score)Avg, gamesCount, LeagueName, Season
    FROM( SELECT  PlayerID, Player.Name as Name, Player.Gender as Gender, ROUND(AVG(score),2) as score, COUNT(score) as gamesCount, LeagueName, Season
        FROM  Scores JOIN Players as Player USING(PlayerID)
        WHERE Score > -1 AND bowlout = 'No' AND season = '2011-2012'
        GROUP BY PlayerID, LeagueName, Season
        HAVING gamesCount >= 50
    ) as league_avg
WHERE Gender = 'Male'
GROUP BY PlayerID
ORDER BY Avg DESC LIMIT 0,50;

Obviously, it doesn't work because the external query only groups by PlayerID, so it gets the max AVG of the player, but the other fields, such as leagueName if there are multiple leagues a player bowls in, are chosen at random from the leagues he plays in.

What I'd like is to get the leagueName (and all the other info) corresponding to the player and his max average.

Here's an example:

Name       |      AVG      |   LeagueName
Jones, Tom      122.56          Friday League
Smith, Adam     182.42          Super League
Smith, Adam     194.25          Friendly League
...

The expected result would be:

Name       |      AVG      |   LeagueName
Smith, Adam     194.25          Friendly League
Jones, Tom      122.56          Friday League

What I'm getting:

Name       |      AVG      |   LeagueName
Smith, Adam     194.25          *Super League*
Jones, Tom      122.56          Friday League

As you can see, Smith, Adam has the correct AVG, but the wrong league associated with the Name/ Avg combo.

I tried changing the external GROUP BY clause to PlayerID, LeagueName, Season, but that just reseparates per league per season and then I get the duplicates back again. I don't know what to try anymore other than just using the Java application this is in, grabbing all the results and removing the duplicates in Java. Obviously, I'd rather get the correct results the first time from a SQL query.

As a side note even though it was mentioned earlier in this post, sometimes the query won't have the "AND season = '2011-2012'" part, so I must not get duplicates for the same player in different seasons either.

Edit: I'm using SQLite in case some people hadn't noticed the tags.

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1  
There is a solution that proved working in my very limited testing. It relies on something that was established empirically and is not documented officially. (I'm not even sure I may say "established", since my testing was too limited. However, my results were consistent throughout the tests.) I do not think this kind of solution is worth promoting by being posted as an answer. If you are interested, you can find a sample query at SQL Fiddle. –  Andriy M Jun 29 '12 at 11:18
    
@AndriyM - Interesting and plausible "solution". But I understand your concern. Even if it does work with this release, how reliable will it be with subsequent releases of SQLite? I agree it's probably not a wise choice. –  dbenham Jun 29 '12 at 16:16
    
@AndriyM Thanks, it works perfectly! You should post this as an answer. I know it might not work with future implementations of SQLite, but for this particular case, it'll work. Next version will be web-based using MySQL, so I know I'm not going to upgrade SQLite anyway. Thanks a lot, make this an answer and I'll mark it as accepted. –  Adam Smith Jun 29 '12 at 16:49
    
Thank you, really. I think it would be better if you posted it as a solution you ended up with. For I'm really concerned that offering such solutions may look like promoting them, but if the author of the question posted it, it would be quite a different matter. And what with your better command of English, I'm sure you would make all the necessary stipulations about the solution being unreliable etc. way more nicely than I could possibly hope to do myself. :) –  Andriy M Jun 29 '12 at 18:02

3 Answers 3

You want to learn the WITH ROLLUP group by modifier

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It doesn't work since I'm using SQLite, thanks anyway. I'll edit my question, but it was already in the tags –  Adam Smith Jun 29 '12 at 1:49

I believe something like this should work.

SELECT PlayerID,
       Name,
       Season,
       CAST( SUBSTR(MAX(stats),1,10) AS REAL) AS Average,
       CAST( SUBSTR(MAX(stats),11,10) AS INTEGER) AS GamesCount,
       SUBSTR(MAX(stats),21) AS LeagueName
  FROM (
          SELECT PlayerID,
                 Player.Name as Name,
                 Season,
                 CASE WHEN LENGTH(ROUND(AVG(score),2))-(LENGTH(CAST(AVG(score) AS INTEGER)))=2
                           THEN SUBSTR('          '||(ROUND(AVG(score),2))||'0', -10,10)
                           ELSE SUBSTR('          '||(ROUND(AVG(score),2)), -10,10)
                   END || SUBSTR('          '||COUNT(score),-10,10) || LeagueName as stats
            FROM Scores
            JOIN Players as Player USING(PlayerID)
           WHERE Score > -1
             AND bowlout = 'No'
           GROUP BY PlayerID, Player.Name, LeagueName, Season
           HAVING COUNT(score) >= 50
       ) AS league_avg
 WHERE Season = '2011-2012'
 GROUP BY PlayerID, Name, Season
 ORDER BY Average DESC LIMIT 0,50
;

I've never used SQLite, so don't be surprised if I've got some faulty syntax. It attempts to concatenate the Average, GameCount, and LeagueName into a single string that can be easily sorted by Average, and also have the components easily extracted using substring operations.

The part I am most unsure about is the formatting of the Average. I used syntax I found at the bottom of this link.

share|improve this answer
    
Nice idea! The only real issue I've been able to spot so far is using the gamesCount name. It is not a column actually. In the OP's query, it was an alias assigned to COUNT(score) (apparently SQLite allows your HAVING clauses to reference columns by their aliases). So it seems (I'm not 105% certain) you only need either to replace gamesCount >= 50 with COUNT(score) >= 50 or to add a column COUNT(score) AS gamesCount to the sub-SELECT list. –  Andriy M Jun 29 '12 at 5:33
    
@AndriyM Is correct, both way work. I'll mark your answer as accepted if I don't get one that runs faster, because even though it works, this query is extremely slow and I don't know where I should be using indexes to improve it. Thanks a ton for the working and ingenious solution –  Adam Smith Jun 29 '12 at 6:23
    
@AndriyM - Yep, I missed that. Thanks. I've edited the answer. –  dbenham Jun 29 '12 at 16:07
up vote 1 down vote accepted

As was posted by Andriy M in the comments, there is a workaround to let the aggregate functions get the correct results for the columns that are not in the GROUP BY clause.

It is not safe to use that workaround for compatibility issues with future versions as it is not defined in the SQLite specifications, but it works for me in this particular case without slowing down the query, which is exactly what I wanted.

I don't plan on upgrading my SQLite version in the future either as I already have plans to put my application online with a MySQL database instead, so I feel like posting this answer is justified since it solves my problem perfectly.

The trick is to use ORDER BY in the inner query on the field for the averages. It works because when the external query tries to GROUP BY PlayerID, the other columns that are not grouped by that get used are the ones that go with the last instance of the field that is grouped by. So if a PlayerID has three different averages, in the inner query the highest average will be last, and thus the external query will use the fields that come with the last instance of that particular PlayerID.

Here's the code, the added line has a comment by it:

SELECT  PlayerID, Name, max(score)Avg, gamesCount, LeagueName, Season
FROM( SELECT  PlayerID, Player.Name as Name, Player.Gender as Gender, ROUND(AVG(score),2) as score, COUNT(score) as gamesCount, LeagueName, Season
    FROM  Scores JOIN Players as Player USING(PlayerID)
    WHERE Score > -1 AND bowlout = 'No' AND season = '2011-2012'
    GROUP BY PlayerID, LeagueName, Season
    HAVING gamesCount >= 50
    ORDER BY score /* Here is the added line that solves it all */
) as league_avg
WHERE Gender = 'Male'
GROUP BY PlayerID
ORDER BY Avg DESC LIMIT 0,50;
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