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consider this baby simple piece of code

pg.connect( {
    user: 'hhope',
    password: '...',
    port: 5432,
    host: '/var/run/postgresql',
    database: 'phiddler' },
  function( err, client ) {
    client.query(
      "select count(1) as ct from pg_prepared_statements",
      function( err, results ) {
        console.log( 'prepared statement count: '+results.rows[0].ct );
        client.query( {
                    name: 'test2' ,
                    text: "insert into t1( c2 ) values( 'q1')" },
          function( err, result ) {
            console.log( 'inserted t1' );
            client.query(
              "select count(1) as ct from pg_prepared_statements",
               function( err, results ) {
                  console.log( 'prepared statement count: '+results.rows[0].ct );
               } );
           }
        );
      }
    );
  }
);

if written procedurally would be

pg = new PG(...);
client = new pg.client();
console.log( client.col( "select ..." ) );
client.prepare( 'test2', "insert into t1( c2 ) values( 'q1')" );
console.log( client.col( "select ..." ) );

in my mind the latter is far more readable and maintainable.

is there some sort of compromise approach that would make the standard indented callback style more readable?

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Belongs on: codereview.stackexchange.com –  Diodeus Jun 29 '12 at 2:52
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You want to use the async library's waterfall mechanism:

var async = require('async');

async.waterfall([
    pg.connect.bind(this, {
        user: 'user', password: 'pass', port: 5432, host: '/somewhere/', database: 'db'
    }),
    function(client, callback) {
        client.query('select * from foo', callback)
    }
], function(err, results) {
    console.log(results);
});

The bind method added to Functions in ES5 is very useful in combination with the async library, since often the last argument in the list is a callback, and the earlier values are often known before entering the chain.

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The procedural variant isn't really equivalent - I assume its synchronous, whereas the original probably isn't.

If you don't need to close over variables, you can just use named functions. Something like:

function f2(){}
function f1() {
    client.query("select count(1) as ct from pg_prepared_statements", f2);
}
pg.connect( {
    user: 'hhope',
    password: '...',
    port: 5432,
    host: '/var/run/postgresql',
    database: 'phiddler' },
    f1
);
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The connect method passes the client object into its callback, so as written that won't work. –  David Ellis Jun 29 '12 at 6:21
    
agree that they're not equivalent, with the latter being synchronous (as you said). did not put in variable assignment because did not want people addressing whether could be done in one vs two client calls as versus the syntax itself. agree, can name funcs, but imho worser of two evils. –  cc young Jun 29 '12 at 7:36
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"Readable" is a matter of opinion, but you could do this:

var iter = function(cb) {
   var v = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments);
   var f = function() {
        var g = v.shift();
        g && g(f);
   };

   f();
};

iter(function(cb) {
        console.log('in f1');
        cb();
     },
     function(cb) {
        console.log('in f2');
        cb();
     });
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