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I've been researching this for a couple of days and I'm seing a lot of answers to similar questions and they are unfortunately all "No, you can't do that." So, perhaps you can help me find a more efficient way or perhaps you have a better answer.

I'm running a game at an event. When users sign up for my game, they'll authorize my Facebook app. They get points in my game for doing certain things. One of the things they get points for is Liking a chosen Facebook page.

They don't Like the page through any interface I control though, so I'm going to be running a process in the background which checks if my authorized users have liked the page.

I'm going to have tens of thousands of people playing this game though. I've got an access_token for each of them and I know I can fetch a list of likes for Person X with their access_token, but fetching 10,000+ lists of likes to check if they've liked the page seems ridiculous... especially since if they haven't liked it, I can't just cross them off the list. I need to keep checking every few minutes for the duration of the event just to see if they have liked the page yet and give them points. Once they have liked the page then I no longer need to keep checking them, but that's still going to require a ton of requests.

Is there a way that I can determine which of my 10k+ users, for whom I have individual access_tokens, have liked my page?

Or can I get list of people who have recently liked a particular page?

Any other suggestions?

EDIT: As the administrator of my FB page, I can use the website to just click through and I can see all of the people who have liked my page, so I feel like there should be some way to access this information programmatically as well. Am I just missing something?

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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This problem seems like a candidate for using FQL. There's a table called page_fan that acts as a join table between the user and page tables. You could run a query for each user to see whether a row exists for the chosen page. For example:

SELECT 1 FROM page_fan WHERE uid = me() and page_id = 8484927467
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I tried that query just now (and before during my research), but I always get back an empty array, even if I use a token for myself (so me() refers to the actual me) and I use a page_id of a page that I like). –  Kenny Wyland Jun 29 '12 at 21:25
    
Hmm, well it works for me. I get back { "data": [ { "anon": "1" } ] } as a response if I like the page. –  Paul Bellora Jun 29 '12 at 21:46
    
It looks like when I copy and pasted the page_id into my test query I missed a number, so it was the wrong id. I tried again with the -right- id and it did return results like you have. I'll give this a try. Thanks. –  Kenny Wyland Jun 30 '12 at 0:02
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I'm running a game at an event. When users sign up for my game, they'll authorize my Facebook app. They get points in my game for doing certain things. One of the things they get points for is Liking a chosen Facebook page.

Please clarify some details on that:

  • is your game app running as a page tab app inside facebook, or some place else?

  • if it is running in a page tab, is that also the page they are required to like?

If that would be the case, you would get the info if the user has liked the page within the signed_request parameter automatically, no further API queries etc. necessary.

fetching 10,000+ lists of likes to check if they've liked the page seems ridiculous...

Keep in mind that you don’t have to go through each user’s list of likes, though – you can ask if someone liked a specific page by querying for /userid/likes/pageid. (I know, it’s still one request for each user.)

I need to keep checking every few minutes for the duration of the event just to see if they have liked the page yet and give them points. Once they have liked the page then I no longer need to keep checking them, but that's still going to require a ton of requests.

Are you aware of the method in the JavaScript SDK of binding an event to a user clicking a like button on your page? Maybe you could use that – implement the like button in your site, catch the event of the user using that very button to like the page … and then AJAX the fact that the like happened to your server, maybe make one more request for that particular user to verify that there’s no “cheating” involved (someone making a call to your AJAX endpoint themselves, without actually having liked) … and you should have what you want, right?

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My game is running some place else. It's not happening on a page tab inside facebook. –  Kenny Wyland Jun 29 '12 at 21:21
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I am familiar with the JS SDK, but I'm not requiring them to Like the page from any particular place. They could do it directly in their iOS or Android Facebook app, or go home and Like the page directly from a desktop browser, etc. –  Kenny Wyland Jun 29 '12 at 21:22
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