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I'm still learning about pointers. I know about switching up if statements and such. In the book i'm using, I was given this example:

    FILE* from = fopen("in.txt", "r");
    FILE* to = fopen("out.txt", "w");
    if (from != NULL && to != NULL)
    {
        ...
    }
    else
    {
        printf("failed to open files!\n");
    }
} /* end of function */

I know that can be changed to this:

    FILE* from = fopen("in.txt", "r");
    FILE* to = fopen("out.txt", "w");
    if (from == NULL || to == NULL)
    {
        printf("failed to open files!\n");
        return;
    }
    ...
} /* end of function */

Now, my question (if it will compile) is if this is safe or implementation defined as NULL is different on virtually every compiler.

    FILE* from = fopen("in.txt", "r");
    FILE* to = fopen("out.txt", "w");
    if ((from & to) == NULL)
    {
        printf("failed to open files!\n");
        return;
    }
    ...
} /* end of function */
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3  
I do not know whether this is well-formed in C, but in C++ it is ill-formed. A pointer is not an integer. Also, it's not nearly as clear as the explicit checks for NULL. (Note also that your program is leaky: if you successfully open one file but not the other, you'll leak the opened file handle.) –  James McNellis Jun 29 '12 at 3:54
    
@JamesMcNellis about the leak. I am aware of that. This is just from a book. It teaches about cleaning up later. (Although I know about fclose) –  Cole Johnson Jun 29 '12 at 3:56
2  
@JamesMcNellis This question is about C. Not C++. –  Cole Johnson Jun 29 '12 at 3:57

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

No.

First, it shouldn't compile, at least not if the compiler is standards-conformant. Pointers are not valid operands for bitwise operators like | and &.

Second, even if your compiler lets you treat pointers as integers, you risk platform incompatibilities; there are C implementations where they're not at all interchangeable. You might assume any such implementations would necessarily also be conformant, but assumptions are rarely safe...

Third, even assuming that ORing two pointers together works, and gets you something that you can compare with NULL, you've changed the sense of the test: (from|to) will only be NULL if both fopens failed; if just one of them succeeded, the result will be nonzero and your code will fail.

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So an & should have been used? Edited. But, my question still holds. –  Cole Johnson Jun 29 '12 at 4:01
    
It's still implementation-defined. –  Mark Reed Jun 29 '12 at 4:02
    
It's not implementation-defined, it's simply not permitted by the standard. No conformant C program is permitted to compute the logical OR of pointers. –  Dietrich Epp Jun 29 '12 at 4:09
    
@DietrichEpp - Edited. Thanks for the correction. –  Mark Reed Jun 29 '12 at 4:30
1  
@Cole - Using an & is even worse, because it tests if the values have any bits in common. The result is close to random. –  Bo Persson Jun 29 '12 at 10:29

No.

For T *x and T *y in C, the expression x|y is meaningless, according to the standard. It should not compile. From n1256 §6.5.12 ¶2 "Bitwise inclusive OR operator":

Each of the operands shall have integer type.

This means that x|y is an error, end of story. The same applies to all other bitwise operators: & | ^ ~ << >> are all only usable on integers (note that "integers" include characters and bools).

However, if you want to save effort typing, it is perfectly valid to use logical operators on pointers.

// x == NULL is exactly semantically equivalent to !x
// These two are exactly the same
if (x == NULL || y == NULL) ...
if (!x || !y) ...

// In a logical expression, x != NULL is exactly semantically equivalent to x
// These two are exactly the same
if (x != NULL && y != NULL) ...
if (x && y) ...

It is up to you whether you think x == NULL is better or !x is better. You had better be able to read both, since both styles are common.

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Don't ever try to play games with bitwise operators and pointers.

If you are just looking for a more terse way to write the expression, this is a pretty common and idiomatic way to do this:

    FILE* from = fopen("in.txt", "r");
    FILE* to = fopen("out.txt", "w");
    if (!from || !to) // note the use of the ! operator
    {
        printf("failed to open files!\n");
        return;
    }
    ...
} /* end of function */

The ! operator is a logical NOT operator. Since the null pointer always has a value of 0, which is a "false" value, the expression !from means "true if from is a null pointer, otherwise false`. It reads pretty well also: "if not from, or not to, then handle an error"

Likewise, people write code like if (from) to check if a pointer is non-NULL.

P.S. I know many people like to use expressions like FILE* when declaring pointers, but I dislike this form, because it is a lie. When you declare FILE *from this means "the expression *from has type FILE". It works to put the * right after the FILE but this makes it look like this means "the expression from has type pointer-to-FILE". It doesn't, and here's an example:

FILE* from, to;

from has type "pointer-to-FILE". What type is to? Why it is plain old FILE, not any sort of pointer. The expression you need to use, if you are declaring these on one line, is:

FILE *from, *to;

This means "the expression *from is type FILE, and the expression *to is type FILE." And it looks like it, once you are used to this.

You could write this, but it's icky.

FILE* from, *to;

Yuck!

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Since the null pointer always has a value of 0 Thats where this comes from. Because 0 & <anything> == 0. –  Cole Johnson Jun 29 '12 at 17:52
1  
Yes, but bitwise operators like & are not defined on pointer values in C, and logical operators like ! are. The C compiler won't let you play the bitwise tricks, and if it did, other programmers looking at your code might be confused. The !from idiom is well-understood in the C community. If you really wanted to do your bitwise AND trick, and you have C99 available, you could cast each pointer to type intptr_t and then bitwise AND the two. Then every other programmer who looks at your code will shout "WTF!" when they see it, but if that's what you want, go ahead. –  steveha Jun 30 '12 at 4:09

from and to are pointers, you cannot do any bitwise operation on them. However, <stdint.h> provides intptr_t which is of integer type and is guaranteed to hold a pointer, so casting your pointers to them first would be valid. However, this is ugly, so I would stick with the more readable version.

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Bitwise operation are not allowed on pointers.

You should avoid such exercise.

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