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So i have a set of two lists of x, y, z points.

List1 and List2.

I would like to remove all of the points that exist in List1 that also exist in List2. In this example most of the points in List2 (likely 100%) will exist in List1. example:

List1

1, 2, 3
4, 5, 6
7, 8, 9

List2

7, 8, 9

Output

1, 2, 3
4, 5, 6

This will happen on the thousands of points per list size. Obviously this can be done by looping through List2 and searching list 1 which has a time of O(n*m). Is there a faster and more matlab native way to do this?

Thanks for the help.

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Depending on your version of Matlab, have a look at the intersect function? Something like intersect(List1,List2,'rows')? (mind the gotchas about legacy/future versions of intersect as described in the article) –  mathematical.coffee Jun 29 '12 at 5:14

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Try: SETDIFF(List1, List2, 'rows')

(I don't know how efficient that is, but since it's a native method it is probably optimized.)

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You should mention that you can use the setOrder parameter to specify if the output should be sorted or stable, if that matters. –  tmpearce Jun 29 '12 at 5:31

@Turix's setdiff option should work. Another option (just for kicks) is

List1(~ismember(List1,List2,'rows'), :);
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I found a marginally faster (albeit less general) way to do this. First answer so bear with me as I learn formatting...

I found no noteworthy scaling effects, so I'll use as an example the following Lists objects:

example_step=3;
max_value_outer=example_step*333;
max_value_inner=example_step*33;
List1=[1:example_step:max_value_outer; 2:example_step:max_value_outer; 3:example_step:max_value_outer]';
List2=[1:example_step:max_value_inner; 2:example_step:max_value_inner; 3:example_step:max_value_inner]';

Turix's built-in setdiff call provides the best results so far, running the following block of code in just under 3 seconds:

tic; 
  for i=1:10000 result=setdiff(list1,list2,'rows'); 
  end;
toc
>> Elapsed time is 2.821303 seconds.

However if your example data set is representative of the fact that your data are vectors, integers, and in a reasonably limited range then you can speed things up by comparing the linear index equivalent instead of the triplet by using sub2ind, like this:

range=max_value_outer*ones(1,3);
[c,ia] = setdiff(sub2ind(range,List1(:,1),List1(:,2),List1(:,3)), sub2ind(range,List2(:,1),List2(:,2),List2(:,3))); result=List1(ia,:);
  result=List1(ia,:); 

If you run that 10,000 times to compare to a direct setdiff by rows, you get this

tic;
for i=1:10000 
  range=max_value_outer*ones(1,3); 
  [c,ia] = setdiff(sub2ind(range,List1(:,1),List1(:,2),List1(:,3)), sub2ind(range,List2(:,1),List2(:,2),List2(:,3))); 
  result=List1(ia,:); 
end; 
toc
>> Elapsed time is 2.285992 seconds.

So a drop of %20 or so in execution time from setdiff(,,'row) and about 98% from a for loop implementation (not shown). Depending on exactly what your data looks like I can think of a few ideas that might speed things up further. For example if the maximum_value you're considering is relatively small compared to memory, you could possibly take advantage of linear indexing by mapping the sample space onto memory, then using the linear indices from List1 set bits high followed by the set from List2 to set them low. Any bits that remained high would be on List1 but not List2. There is a simplified version of that here although I don't vouch for that implementation.

Hope that helps!

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