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I'm trying to find out if there are any methods in Java which would me achieve the following.

I want to pass a method a parameter like below

"(hi|hello) my name is (Bob|Robert). Today is a (good|great|wonderful) day."

I want the method to select one of the words inside the parenthesis separated by '|' and return the full string with one of the words randomly selected. Does Java have any methods for this or would I have to code this myself using character by character checks in loops?

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regex is best option for your purpose... –  Abhishek bhutra Jun 29 '12 at 5:57

6 Answers 6

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You can parse it by regexes.

The regex would be \(\w+(\|\w+)*\); in the replacement you just split the argument on the '|' and return the random word.

Something like

import java.util.regex.*;

public final class Replacer {

  //aText: "(hi|hello) my name is (Bob|Robert). Today is a (good|great|wonderful) day."
  //returns: "hello my name is Bob. Today is a wonderful day."
  public static String getEditedText(String aText){
    StringBuffer result = new StringBuffer();
    Matcher matcher = fINITIAL_A.matcher(aText);
    while ( matcher.find() ) {
      matcher.appendReplacement(result, getReplacement(matcher));
    }
    matcher.appendTail(result);
    return result.toString();
  }

  private static final Pattern fINITIAL_A = Pattern.compile(
    "\\\((\\\w+(\\\|\w+)*)\\\)",
    Pattern.CASE_INSENSITIVE
  );

  //aMatcher.group(1): "hi|hello"
  //words: ["hi", "hello"]
  //returns: "hello"
  private static String getReplacement(Matcher aMatcher){
    var words = aMatcher.group(1).split('|');
    var index = randomNumber(0, words.length);
    return words[index];
  }

} 

(Note that this code is written just to illustrate an idea and probably won't compile)

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yes regex will be the best choice –  RTA Jun 29 '12 at 5:50

May be it helps,

Pass three strings("hi|hello"),(Bob|Robert) and (good|great|wonderful) as arguments to the method.

Inside method split the string into array by, firststringarray[]=thatstring.split("|"); use this for other two.

and Use this to use random string selection.

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still i think regex will be the best and straight forward solution –  RTA Jun 29 '12 at 5:56
1  
+1 For your smart answer without any complication –  RPB Jun 29 '12 at 5:59
    
@ Rinalkumar Thanks –  Shalini Jun 29 '12 at 7:20

As per my knowledge java don't have any method to do it directly.

I have to write code for it or regexe

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I don't think Java has anything that will do what you want directly. Personally, instead of doing things based on regexps or characters, I would make a method something like:

String madLib(Set<String> greetings, Set<String> names, Set<String> dispositions)
{
    // pick randomly from each of the sets and insert into your background string
}
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There is no direct support for this. And you should ideally not try a low level solution.

You should search for 'random sentence generator'. The way you are writing

`(Hi|Hello)`

etc. is called a grammar. You have to write a parser for the grammar. Again there are many solutions for writing parsers. There are standard ways to specify grammar. Look for BNF.

The parser and generator problems have been solved many time over, and the interesting part of your problem will be writing the grammar.

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parser for this one would be a big deal i think –  RTA Jun 29 '12 at 5:58

Java does not provide any readymade method for this. You can use either Regex as described by Penartur or create your own java method to split Strings and store random words. StringTokenizer class can help you if following second approach.

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