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I am currently configuring a new Apple Provisioning Profile and I noticed there are two configuration options which are not documented anywhere (or hidden deep in the documentation).

Enable for Passes
Enable for Data Protection

I know what "Data Protection" means on iOS but I can't find any documentation mentioning this provisioning profile option.

Could you please help me with the meaning of these options?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Data protection is an iOS 5.0 feature. If you use it at a provisioning level (It is an entitlement), your entire application will read-lock its data when your app is not running in the foreground (or if you choose, only when the device is unlocked if you perform tasks in the background). You can see more info in the WWDC 2011 video Session 208 (around the 38 minute mark).

However, as mentioned in paul's answer, Passbook is an iOS 6.0 feature and thus cannot be discussed in more detail than is mentioned on the public page he linked to.

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This is the complete answer. Thanks! –  Sulthan Jun 29 '12 at 8:12

I imagine these are related to iOS 6 and new API's that have come with it, if this is the case (and I bet it is), you won't be able to get much (if any) info on a site like this until it is officially released. I would try searching through the developer forums on Apple's iOS developer site:

https://devforums.apple.com/index.jspa

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Thanks for your answer, didn't realize there are things for iOS 6 already. –  Sulthan Jun 29 '12 at 8:12

I assume passes relates to the new passbook functionality that you can use to create ticketing apps and such like see here for details

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