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Given:

var peoples = [
  { "attr1": "bob", "attr2": "pizza" },
  { "attr1": "john", "attr2": "sushi" },
  { "attr1": "larry", "attr2": "hummus" }
];

Wanted:

Index of object where attr === value for example attr1 === "john" or attr2 === "hummus"

Update: Please, read my question carefully, i do not want to find the object via $.inArray nor i want to get the value of a specific object attribute. Please consider this for your answers. Thanks!

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1  
possible duplicate of Find object by id in array of javascript objects –  Felix Kling Jun 29 '12 at 8:03
    
yes, same use case, but i find my question to be more generic eg better hit rate if you do not have a key named "id" you are searching for. –  return1.at Jun 29 '12 at 8:14

5 Answers 5

up vote 14 down vote accepted

If you want to check on the object itself without interfering with the prototype, use hasOwnProperty():

var getIndexIfObjWithOwnAttr = function(array, attr, value) {
    for(var i = 0; i < array.length; i++) {
        if(array[i].hasOwnProperty(attr) && array[i][attr] === value) {
            return i;
        }
    }
    return -1;
}

to also include prototype attributes, use:

var getIndexIfObjWithAttr = function(array, attr, value) {
    for(var i = 0; i < array.length; i++) {
        if(array[i][attr] === value) {
            return i;
        }
    }
    return -1;
}
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1  
+1 , but why not just return i (instead of $.inArray(array[i], array); )? –  Me.Name Jun 29 '12 at 8:07
    
good point, updated –  return1.at Jun 29 '12 at 8:11
1  
Why do you use i += 1 instead of i++? –  Amberlamps Jun 29 '12 at 8:18
1  
Why use ‘array[i].hasOwnProperty(attr)‘ instead of ‘array[i][attr]‘ ? –  Alain BECKER Jun 29 '12 at 8:22
1  
i suggest adding 'return -1' after the 'for' loop, in case the element wasn't found (similar to javascript's 'indexOf' or jquery's '$.inArray') –  schellmax Jul 5 '12 at 13:46

Using jQuery .each()

$.each(peoples, function(index, obj) {
   $.each(obj, function(attr, value) {
      console.log( attr + ' == ' + value );
   });
});

Working sample

Using for-loop:

for(var i = 0; i < peoples.length; i++) {
   for(var key in peoples[i] ) {
      console.log( key + ' == ' +  peoples[i][key]);
   }
}

Working sample

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function getIndexByAttribute(list, attr, val){
    var result = null;
    $.each(list, function(index, item){
        if(item[attr].toString() == val.toString()){
           result = index;
           return false;     // breaks the $.each() loop
        }
    });
    return result;
}
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Just to clarify one thing: ‘return false‘ might seem unnecessary. One can do without, but it's a good optimisation as it breaks the ‘$.each()‘ loop. Good job! On the other hand, calling ‘.toString()‘ is weird (why not compare values?), and is likely to cause an error if ‘attr‘ is undefined on the ‘item‘, or if val is ‘null‘... Or did I miss a very good reason to use ‘toString()‘ here? –  Alain BECKER Jun 29 '12 at 9:09
    
I don't exactly remember why I've gone that way, but seem to recall it was because of some conflict when the value was a number –  davids Jun 29 '12 at 9:32

Not a direct answer to your question, though I thing it's worse mentioning it, because your question seems like fitting in the general case of "getting things by name in a key-value storage".

If you are not tight to the way "peoples" is implemented, a more JavaScript-ish way of getting the right guy might be :

var peoples = {
  "bob":  { "dinner": "pizza" },
  "john": { "dinner": "sushi" },
  "larry" { "dinner": "hummus" }
};

// If people is implemented this way, then
// you can get values from their name, like :
var theGuy = peoples["john"];

// You can event get directly to the values
var thatGuysPrefferedDinner = peoples["john"].dinner;

Hope if this is not the answer you wanted, it might help people interested in that "key/value" question.

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that does not hit my usecase, but maybe is helpful for others. i should update my question for more generic attribute names to make that clear. –  return1.at Jun 29 '12 at 8:21

Do this way:-

var peoples = [
  { "name": "bob", "dinner": "pizza" },
  { "name": "john", "dinner": "sushi" },
  { "name": "larry", "dinner": "hummus" }
];

$.each(peoples, function(i, val) {
    $.each(val, function(key, name) {
        if (name === "john")
            alert(key + " : " + name);
    });
});

OUTPUT:

name : john

Refer LIVE DEMO

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