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In my current setup, I have a

typedef std::function<void (MyClass&, std::vector<std::string>) MyFunction;
std::map<std::string, MyFunction> dispatch_map;

And I register my functions in it with a macro. However, I have a problem with this: the parameters are passed as a vector of strings, which I have to convert inside the functions. I would rather do this conversion outside the functions, at the dispatcher level. Is this possible? The function signatures are known at compile time, and never change at run time.

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Could you show the interfaces to give us a better idea? –  Ylisar Jun 29 '12 at 9:32
    
Of the functions? –  Tamás Szelei Jun 29 '12 at 9:33
    
NVM, think I understand your problem, it's possible to do what you want if you skip / change the macro. I'll try to make an more elaborate response. –  Ylisar Jun 29 '12 at 9:34
    
BTW, could I see some of the transformations you want to do? It's possible to do it with boost::phoenix, but the expressions becomes pretty cumbersome. It's possible to use a helper if the transformations are similar to make it easier. –  Ylisar Jun 29 '12 at 9:50
    
In almost all cases the conversions are like boost::lexical_cast<int>(str_value) or to some other basic type. –  Tamás Szelei Jun 29 '12 at 10:41

5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can get pretty far with variadic templates and some template/virtual techniques. With the following codes, you'll be able to do something like:

std::string select_string (bool cond, std::string a, std::string b) {
    return cond ? a : b;
}

int main () {
    Registry reg;
    reg.set ("select_it", select_string);
    reg.invoke ("select_it", "1 John Wayne"));
    reg.invoke ("select_it", "0 John Wayne"));
}

output:

John
Wayne

Full implementation:

These codes are exemplary. You should optimize it to provide perfect forwarding less redundancy in parameter list expansion.

Headers and a test-function

#include <functional>
#include <string>
#include <sstream>
#include <istream>
#include <iostream>
#include <tuple>

std::string select_string (bool cond, std::string a, std::string b) {
    return cond ? a : b;
}

This helps us parsing a string and putting results into a tuple:

//----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

template <typename Tuple, int Curr, int Max> struct init_args_helper;

template <typename Tuple, int Max>
struct init_args_helper<Tuple, Max, Max> {
    void operator() (Tuple &, std::istream &) {}
};

template <typename Tuple, int Curr, int Max>
struct init_args_helper {
    void operator() (Tuple &tup, std::istream &is) {
        is >> std::get<Curr>(tup);
        return init_args_helper<Tuple, Curr+1, Max>() (tup, is);
    }
};


template <int Max, typename Tuple>
void init_args (Tuple &tup, std::istream &ss)
{
    init_args_helper<Tuple, 0, Max>() (tup, ss);
}

This unfolds a function pointer and a tuple into a function call (by function-pointer):

//----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

template <int ParamIndex, int Max, typename Ret, typename ...Args>
struct unfold_helper;

template <int Max, typename Ret, typename ...Args>
struct unfold_helper<Max, Max, Ret, Args...> {
    template <typename Tuple, typename ...Params>
    Ret unfold (Ret (*fun) (Args...), Tuple tup, Params ...params)
    {
        return fun (params...);
    }
};

template <int ParamIndex, int Max, typename Ret, typename ...Args>
struct unfold_helper {
    template <typename Tuple, typename ...Params>
    Ret unfold (Ret (*fun) (Args...), Tuple tup, Params ...params)
    {
        return unfold_helper<ParamIndex+1, Max, Ret, Args...> ().
               unfold(fun, tup, params..., std::get<ParamIndex>(tup));
    }
};



template <typename Ret, typename ...Args>
Ret unfold (Ret (*fun) (Args...), std::tuple<Args...> tup) {
    return unfold_helper<0, sizeof...(Args), Ret, Args...> ().unfold(fun, tup);
}

This function puts it together:

//----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

template <typename Ret, typename ...Args>
Ret foo (Ret (*fun) (Args...), std::string mayhem) {

    // Use a stringstream for trivial parsing.
    std::istringstream ss;
    ss.str (mayhem);

    // Use a tuple to store our parameters somewhere.
    // We could later get some more performance by combining the parsing
    // and the calling.
    std::tuple<Args...> params;
    init_args<sizeof...(Args)> (params, ss);

    // This demondstrates expanding the tuple to full parameter lists.
    return unfold<Ret> (fun, params);
}

Here's our test:

int main () {
    std::cout << foo (select_string, "0 John Wayne") << '\n';
    std::cout << foo (select_string, "1 John Wayne") << '\n';
}

Warning: Code needs more verification upon parsing and should use std::function<> instead of naked function pointer


Based on above code, it is simple to write a function-registry:

class FunMeta {
public:
    virtual ~FunMeta () {}
    virtual boost::any call (std::string args) const = 0;
};

template <typename Ret, typename ...Args>
class ConcreteFunMeta : public FunMeta {
public:
    ConcreteFunMeta (Ret (*fun) (Args...)) : fun(fun) {}

    boost::any call (std::string args) const {
        // Use a stringstream for trivial parsing.
        std::istringstream ss;
        ss.str (args);

        // Use a tuple to store our parameters somewhere.
        // We could later get some more performance by combining the parsing
        // and the calling.
        std::tuple<Args...> params;
        init_args<sizeof...(Args)> (params, ss);

        // This demondstrates expanding the tuple to full parameter lists.
        return unfold<Ret> (fun, params);
    }

private:
    Ret (*fun) (Args...);
};

class Registry {
public:
    template <typename Ret, typename ...Args>
    void set (std::string name, Ret (*fun) (Args...)) {
        funs[name].reset (new ConcreteFunMeta<Ret, Args...> (fun));
    }

    boost::any invoke (std::string name, std::string args) const {
        const auto it = funs.find (name);
        if (it == funs.end())
            throw std::runtime_error ("meh");
        return it->second->call (args);
    }

private:
    // You could use a multimap to support function overloading.
    std::map<std::string, std::shared_ptr<FunMeta>> funs;
};

One could even think of supporting function overloading with this, using a multimap and dispatching decisions based on what content is on the passed arguments.

Here's how to use it:

int main () {
    Registry reg;
    reg.set ("select_it", select_string);
    std::cout << boost::any_cast<std::string> (reg.invoke ("select_it", "0 John Wayne")) << '\n'
              << boost::any_cast<std::string> (reg.invoke ("select_it", "1 John Wayne")) << '\n';
}
share|improve this answer

If you can use boost, then here's an example of what I think you're trying to do ( although might work with std as well, I stick with boost personally ):

typedef boost::function<void ( MyClass&, const std::vector<std::string>& ) MyFunction;
std::map<std::string, MyFunction> dispatch_map;
namespace phx = boost::phoenix;
namespace an = boost::phoenix::arg_names;
dispatch_map.insert( std::make_pair( "someKey", phx::bind( &MyClass::CallBack, an::_1, phx::bind( &boost::lexical_cast< int, std::string >, phx::at( an::_2, 0 ) ) ) ) );
dispatch_map["someKey"]( someClass, std::vector< std::string >() );

However, as this sort of nesting quickly becomes fairly unreadable, it's usually best to either create a helper ( free function, or better yet a lazy function ) that does the conversion.

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If I understand correctly, the output of phx::bind will be a functor that has the same signature as my callback, but wraps the string conversion in it. If that is so, I can't store it in a map of MyFunctions, since that's a different type. –  Tamás Szelei Jun 29 '12 at 11:13
    
They're very relaxed, the result of phx::bind is convertible to pretty much any boost::function<> that would be able to invoke it. I'll add some clarification to better match your signature. –  Ylisar Jun 29 '12 at 11:36

If I understand you correctly, you want to register void MyClass::Foo(int) and void MyClass::Bar(float), accepting that there will be a cast from std::string to int or float as appropriate.

To do this, you need a helper class:

class Argument {
  std::string s;
  Argument(std::string const& s) : s(s) { }
  template<typename T> operator T { return boost::lexical_cast<T>(s); }
};

This makes it possible to wrap both void MyClass::Foo(int) and void MyClass::Bar(float) in a std::function<void(MyClass, Argument))>.

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using boost::any or boost::variant would be better i think, i cant remember which one is the right one for this job right now though –  smerlin Jun 29 '12 at 11:52
    
@smerlin: Both types can hold any argument, but neither has an operator T. –  MSalters Jun 29 '12 at 11:54
    
Yes, but using them instead of std::string inside your Argument class will provide means of error (=type missmatch) detection, which boost::lexical_cast does not offer. –  smerlin Jun 29 '12 at 12:05
    
@smerlin: Since you start with a std::vector<std::string>, you can't have compile-time type checking anyway. Only at run time can you detect that std::string("5.3") isn't a proper argument for void MyClass::Foo(int) –  MSalters Jun 29 '12 at 12:54

Interesting problme. This is indeen not trivial in C++, I wrote a self-contained implementation in C++11. It is possible to do the same in C++03 but the code would be (even) less readable.

#include <iostream>
#include <sstream>
#include <string>
#include <functional>
#include <vector>
#include <cassert>
#include <map>
using namespace std;

// string to target type conversion. Can replace with boost::lexical_cast.
template<class T> T fromString(const string& str)
{ stringstream s(str); T r; s >> r; return r; }

// recursive construction of function call with converted arguments
template<class... Types> struct Rec;
template<> struct Rec<> { // no parameters
    template<class F> static void call
    (const F& f, const vector<string>&, int) { f(); }
};
template<class Type> struct Rec< Type > { // one parameter
    template<class F> static void call
    (const F& f, const vector<string>& arg, int index) {
        f(fromString<Type>(arg[index]));
    }
};
template<class FirstType, class... NextTypes>
struct Rec< FirstType, NextTypes... > { // many parameters
    template<class F> static void call
    (const F& f, const vector<string>& arg, int index) {
        Rec<NextTypes...>::call(
            bind1st(f, fromString<FirstType>(arg[index])), // convert 1st param
            arg,
            index + 1
        );
    }
};

template<class... Types> void call // std::function call with strings
(const function<void(Types...)>& f, const vector<string>& args) {
    assert(args.size() == sizeof...(Types));
    Rec<Types...>::call(f, args, 0);
}
template<class... Types> void call // c function call with strings
(void (*f)(Types...), const vector<string>& args) {
    call(function<void(Types...)>(f), args);
}

// transformas arbitrary function to take strings parameters
template<class F> function<void(const vector<string>&)> wrap(const F& f) { 
    return [&] (const vector<string>& args) -> void { call(f, args); };
}

// the dynamic dispatch table and registration routines
map<string, function<void(const vector<string>&)> > table;
template<class F> void registerFunc(const string& name, const F& f) {
    table.insert(make_pair(name, wrap(f)));
}
#define smartRegister(F) registerFunc(#F, F)

// some dummy functions
void f(int x, float y) { cout << "f: " << x << ", " << y << endl; }
void g(float x) { cout << "g: " << x << endl; }

// demo to show it all works;)
int main() {
    smartRegister(f);
    smartRegister(g);
    table["f"]({"1", "2.0"});
    return 0;
}

Also, for performances, it's better to use unordered_map instead of map, and maybe avoid std::function overhead if you only have regular C functions. Of course this is only meaningful if dispatch time is significant compared to functions run-times.

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No, C++ provides no facility for this to occur.

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2  
Can you elaborate why? I know this is the reflex that is triggered when someone mentions dynamism and C++ in the same sentence, but I'm not looking for reflection or anything like that. I'm OK with some boilerplate, I need to write code that interoperates with something. –  Tamás Szelei Jun 29 '12 at 9:30
2  
Of course it does. While the invocation is dynamic, the function themselves - and therefore the argument conversions - are statically determined. –  MSalters Jun 29 '12 at 11:30

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