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I want to bind my custom type (with properties, or data lets say, that are filled in runtime). As I don't know the number of properties at compile time, I need to create a list that contain them and they value.

Later, I want to bind a list with this objects to some grid or DropDownList.

I know that those controls receive a DataSource (object) through the DataSource property, and when I call the method DataBind(), the default implementation use reflection to get properties and data and write to that control.

I have a type, lets imagine:

class MyDynamicDataObject {
Dictionary<string, object> _properties;

public MyDynamicDataObject() {
    _properties = new Dictionary<string, object>();
}

public void Add(string property, object value) {
    _properties.Add(property, value);   
}

}

But I need know to "override" or lets say, return in abstract way, the properties of my type, that are contained in _properties Dictionary data-structure.

How can I do this to let controls use DataBind and use default implementation (use Type.GetProperties) - but instead of return my type properties that are none, return an abstraction that are contained in the dictionary?

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
(added full example to existing answer) –  Marc Gravell Jun 29 '12 at 9:38

2 Answers 2

Most data-binding already supports dynamic data models, but not dynamic data models. By which I mean: there are existing mechanisms for this, including ICustomTypeDescriptor, (perhaps via TypeDescriptionProvider), ITypedList, and PropertyDescriptor. This is the mechanism used by DataTable and similar, so is well exercised. Since you are binding to a list, ITypedList is probably the most appropriate interface to implement, which means you just need to write a custom PropertyDescriptor that maps between your dictionary API and the descriptor API.

Here's a winforms example:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.ComponentModel;
using System.Linq;
using System.Windows.Forms;

static class Program
{
    [STAThread]
    static void Main()
    {
        using(var form = new Form())
        using(var grid = new DataGridView())
        {
            var list = new MySpecialList();
            var obj = new MyDynamicDataObject();
            obj["Foo"] = 123;
            obj["Bar"] = "def";
            list.Add(obj);
            obj = new MyDynamicDataObject();
            obj["Bar"] = "abc";
            obj["Blap"] = 123.4F;
            list.Add(obj);

            grid.DataSource = list;
            grid.Dock = DockStyle.Fill;
            form.Controls.Add(grid);
            Application.Run(form);
        }
    }
}
class MySpecialList : List<MyDynamicDataObject>, ITypedList
{
    PropertyDescriptorCollection ITypedList.GetItemProperties(PropertyDescriptor[] listAccessors)
    {
        // don't worry about sub-property access unless you need to
        if(listAccessors != null && listAccessors.Length != 0) throw new NotSupportedException();

        var allKeys = new HashSet<string>();
        foreach(var item in this)
        {
            foreach (string key in item.GetKeys()) allKeys.Add(key);
        }
        var props = allKeys.Select(key => new MyDynamicDataObjectDescriptor(key));
        return new PropertyDescriptorCollection(props.ToArray());
    }
    private class MyDynamicDataObjectDescriptor : PropertyDescriptor
    {
        public MyDynamicDataObjectDescriptor(string name) : base(name, new Attribute[0]) { }

        public MyDynamicDataObject GetObject(object component)
        {
            return (MyDynamicDataObject) component;
        }
        public override object GetValue(object component)
        {
            return GetObject(component)[Name];
        }
        public override void SetValue(object component, object value)
        {
            GetObject(component)[Name] = value;
        }
        public override bool CanResetValue(object component)
        {
            return false;
        }
        public override void ResetValue(object component)
        {
            throw new NotSupportedException();
        }
        public override bool ShouldSerializeValue(object component)
        {
            return false;
        }
        public override bool IsReadOnly
        {
            get { return false; }
        }
        public override Type ComponentType
        {
            get { return typeof (MyDynamicDataObject); }
        }
        public override Type PropertyType
        {
            get { return typeof (object); }
        }
    }

    string ITypedList.GetListName(PropertyDescriptor[] listAccessors)
    {
        throw new System.NotImplementedException();
    }
}
class MyDynamicDataObject
{
    // don't recommend inheriting this; confuses matters a lot...
    private Dictionary<string,object> props = new Dictionary<string, object>();
    public string[] GetKeys()
    {
        return props.Keys.ToArray();
    }
    public void Clear(string key)
    {
        props.Remove(key);
    }
    public object this[string key]
    {
        get
        {
            object value;
            if (!props.TryGetValue(key, out value)) value = null;
            return value;
        }
        set
        {
            props[key] = value;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
OK Marc very thanks for this cool code and information. You can do something more efficient when you use the HashSet. As GetItemProperties is called for each item in the list, you are iterating the list over and over, if the list contains thousands of items you iterate thousands times, for each item. Is is better to make the code more generic. I will put the final code in a next awnser below :) –  goncalordi Jun 29 '12 at 14:10
    
@goncaloR yes, but: it depends on whether you know, or care about, each object having the same properties. That code was intended to get the superset of properties from all objects (not necessarily the same) in the list. If you have a scenario that allows for an optimisation: all the better. –  Marc Gravell Jun 29 '12 at 14:44
up vote 1 down vote accepted
 public interface IDynamicObject
{
    string[] Properties { get; }
    void Clear();
    object this[string property] { get; set; }
}



public class DynamicObject : IDynamicObject
{
    readonly Dictionary<string, object> _dynamicProperties = new Dictionary<string, object>();

    public string[] Properties
    {
        get { return _dynamicProperties.Keys.ToArray(); }
    }

    public void Clear() { _dynamicProperties.Clear(); }

    public object this[string property]
    {
        get
        {
            object value;

            if (!_dynamicProperties.TryGetValue(property, out value))
                value = null;

            return value;
        }

        set
        {
            _dynamicProperties[property] = value;
        }
    }
}



public class DynamicObjectPropertyDescriptor<T> : PropertyDescriptor
    where T : IDynamicObject
{
    public DynamicObjectPropertyDescriptor(string name) : base(name, new Attribute[0])
    {

    }



    T Get(object component)
    {
        return (T)component;
    }



    public override bool IsReadOnly                                  { get { return false; } }
    public override bool CanResetValue(object component)             { return true; }
    public override void ResetValue(object component)                { Get(component)[Name] = null; }

    public override Type ComponentType                               { get { return typeof(T); } }
    public override Type PropertyType                                { get { return typeof(object); } }

    public override object  GetValue(object component)               { 
        return Get(component)[Name];
    }
    public override void    SetValue(object component, object value) { 
        Get(component)[Name] = value; 
    }

    public override bool ShouldSerializeValue(object component)      { return false; }
}



public class DynamicList<T> : List<T>, ITypedList 
    where T : IDynamicObject
{
    int bindingIndex = 0;


    public PropertyDescriptorCollection GetItemProperties(PropertyDescriptor[] listAccessors)
    {
        if (listAccessors != null && listAccessors.Length != 0)
            throw new NotSupportedException();

        if (Count == 0)
            return new PropertyDescriptorCollection(new[] { new DynamicObjectPropertyDescriptor<T>("-") });

        PropertyDescriptorCollection result = new PropertyDescriptorCollection(this[bindingIndex].Properties.Select(prop => new DynamicObjectPropertyDescriptor<T>(prop)).ToArray());

        if (++bindingIndex == Count)
            bindingIndex = 0;

        return result;
    }

    public string GetListName(PropertyDescriptor[] listAccessors)
    {
        return typeof(DynamicList<T>).Name;
    }
}

To see this working:

DynamicList<DynamicObject> list = new DynamicList<DynamicObject>();

        DynamicObject a1 = new DynamicObject();

        a1["nome"] = "Goncalo Dias";
        a1["numero"] = 30337;


        DynamicObject a2 = new DynamicObject();

        a2["nome"] = "Carlos Antunes";
        a2["numero"] = 10222;


        DynamicObject a3 = new DynamicObject();

        a3["nome"] = "Tiago Rodrigues";
        a3["numero"] = 4040;

        DynamicObject a4 = new DynamicObject();

        a4["nome"] = "Digoo Martins";
        a4["numero"] = 1220;
        a4["morada"] = "Rua da esquina";

        list.Add(a1);
        list.Add(a2);
        list.Add(a3);
        list.Add(a4);


        ultraGrid1.DataSource = list;
        ultraGrid1.DataBind();
share|improve this answer
    
Note the "use the first record as a template" is fine for homogeneous data. It wasn't clear to me (from the question) whether it was homogeneous vs heterogeneous –  Marc Gravell Jun 29 '12 at 15:36
    
@MarcGravell: note the use of the bindingIndex variable, that is incremented for each item in the list, and if the context item contains more properties, they will be displayed too: Note the use of this[bindingIndex].Properties that return the properties for the context item –  goncalordi Jun 29 '12 at 16:10
    
list binding doesn't usually happen per row; it is normally: 1. Get metadata (properties), 2. Loop over rows, using properties we already found –  Marc Gravell Jun 29 '12 at 17:03
    
@MarcGravell, GetItemProperties is called by each row, so we can extract each item properties and bind it to the grid :) –  goncalordi Jul 2 '12 at 13:16
    
that is unusual. What UI tool/framework is this? I.e. what is doing the data-binding here? –  Marc Gravell Jul 2 '12 at 19:25

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