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in the following code:

void fusioneArray(int v[], int vL, int w[], int wL[], int *fusione)
{
   int i,j,temp;
   int k=0;
   printf("%d",wL+vL);

   for(i=0;i<vL;i++)
   {
       fusione[k]=v[i];
       k++;
   }

   for(j=0;j<wL;j++)
   {
       fusione[k]=w[j];
       k++;
   }
}

int main()
{
    int v[5]={1,2,3,4,5};
    int w[5]={5,4,3,2,1};
    int i=0;
    int fusione[10];
    fusioneArray(v,5,w,5,fusione);
}

can u explain me why vL+wL returns * instead of +? (25 instead of 10)...

share|improve this question
3  
int wL[]? Did you mean int wL? – Henrik Jun 29 '12 at 9:38
up vote 7 down vote accepted

Because wL is a pointer in your code, thus you're doing pointer arithmetics instead of a standard integer arithmetics :

wL+vL = wL + vL*sizeof(int)

Since a int is 4-bytes on most platforms your wL+vL becomes 5+5*4 = 25, which is the result you get. Simply replace int wL[] with the correct int wL and you'll have the desired behavior.

share|improve this answer
    
And sometimes even more hilariously left field than that, since it's a compiler-defined sort of thing. When I get massive negative numbers on simple arithmetic, I know I screwed up pointers somewhere. – SilverbackNet Jun 29 '12 at 9:40
    
i had not seen [] in wL -.-" thanks for your reply. :) – Antonio Ciccia Jun 29 '12 at 9:41

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