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What if I want to take user input from the args[0] array, but just in case I (the user) forgot to define it, I wanted a prompt to come up - is it better to use an if block to determine whether the array item(s) is empty or not, or to catch the exception? So, is this

public class Stuff {
    static Scanner input = new Scanner(System.in);
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        String foo;
        if(args.length > 0) {
            foo = args[0];
        }
        else {
            foo = getString("Input? ");
        }
    }
    public static String getString(String prompt) {
        System.out.print(prompt + " ");
        String answer = input.nextLine();
        return answer;
    }   
}

better or worse than

public class Stuff {
    static Scanner input = new Scanner(System.in);
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        String foo;
        try {
            foo = args[0];
        }
        catch(ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException e) {
            foo = getString("Input? ");
        }
    }
    public static String getString(String prompt) {
        System.out.print(prompt + " ");
        String answer = input.nextLine();
        return answer;
    }   
}
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The behavior is not the same. The if example will still throw an ArrayOutOfBoundException because you are trying to access the args[0]. You should use args.length to check if the array is not empty, and then check that the first element of the array is not null. –  Sebastien Jun 29 '12 at 9:44
    
"The if example will still throw an ArrayOutOfBoundException because you are trying to access the args[0]." The OP has changed the array check to if(args.length > 0) {. The original question still stands. Which construct is better? if-else or try-catch? Better in what way, and why? –  ADTC Apr 7 at 6:40

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You need to test args.length rather than reading args[0]

But apart from that error, it is better to use if/else for the following reasons:

  • It makes the code clearer
  • It has better performance (although not relevant in this case)
  • There is no exceptional condition (it is expected that the args array may be empty in some circumstances e.g. "user error", so the code should be able to handle it). Exception throwing should be reserved for exceptional situations that shouldn't happen.
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There is also the issue of side effects. When a code is "tried", it may make changes to the state of the program or data - changes that should not happen if a certain condition will result in an exception being thrown. Using if-else will avoid side effects as it will skip the entire code if the given condition is currently false - resulting in better data integrity. –  ADTC Apr 7 at 8:18

Your first example will still throw an exception since in the if statent you are still accessing an index which does not exist.

If you want to use an if statement then you should be checking that the length of the array is greater than the index you are trying to access for example

if(args.length > 0)
    foo = args[0];
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The original question was modified.. this may no longer be valid. –  user195488 Dec 13 '12 at 14:01

IMO, if-else is better/faster in this case.

Throwing an exception is used when you are inside a method and you want to say to the caller that something went wrong, and you can't do it with the return value.

But as said Jon Taylor, your if statement won't work that way.

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All you really need is a single line of code.

final String foo = args.length > 0? args[0] : getString("Input? ");
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I agree, although a lot of people hate that kind of statement, I personally love them but many don't. Also it doesn't really answer the question. Or atleast it doesn't explain why you've changed his if statement. –  Jon Taylor Jun 29 '12 at 9:46
2  
@JonTaylor OP is already well-served by yours and other answers. This is a kind of a supplement. –  Marko Topolnik Jun 29 '12 at 9:49
    
True :), I do love this kind of statement, to me its very clear and concise. To be honest I wish more people used them. –  Jon Taylor Jun 29 '12 at 9:50
    
@JonTaylor The most important feature for me is that it is FP-like. Ever since Clojure became my primary language, I use this whenever I can, even in much more complex combinations (like simulating a lisp cond instead of if-else if-else if and similar). –  Marko Topolnik Jun 29 '12 at 9:52

Use if block to check whether array is empty that is easy and faster.

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This is ok but if for example they decide to access element 1 instead of 0, checking it is empy is not sufficient. Checking that the length is greater than the index is. –  Jon Taylor Jun 29 '12 at 9:48
    
I'm not sure about "faster" in the common case, i.e. when the array element is there all right. I believe there are at least implementations where a try block has no performance impact, and all the work is done in the stack unwinder when an exception actually occurs, so the common case works with one less branching instruction. As performance shouldn't be critical in the above case, it's not a major issue here, but worth considering in general. –  MvG Jun 29 '12 at 9:51

Given the correction evidenced by Jon Taylor, I will prefer the version with if.

Not only for the speed gain (that in your example I guess will be not noticeable), but because the code with the if better explains its intents, simplifying future maintenance on the code.

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