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I have the following code:

def query(self,query):
  lock = QMutexLocker(self.mutex)
  reply = self.conn.query(query)
  if (re.search("error", reply) != None):
    raise GeneralError("Query error")

  #more code...  
  return reply

Now, if the exception is thrown lock doesnt seem to be deleted, cause the mutex is not released. I can ofcourse do "del lock" everywhere, but that takes away the whole point of qmutexlocker. Does this have to do with Python garbage-collection? If so, that must mean QMutexLocker is not usable at all in Python?

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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you want the mutex released prior to raising an exception, then release it:

def query(self, query):
    lock = QMutexLocker(self.mutex)
    reply = self.conn.query(query)
    if re.search("error", reply):
        lock.unlock()
        raise GeneralError("Query error")

If you are hoping that when lock goes out of scope that it will be instantly released, you are expecting too much of the interpreter. Since you know exactly when and why the lock should be released, do it.

As a general rule — Python or elsewhere — you should always have a mutex bound the smallest possible action. I'll assume that you know that whatever query is doing actually requires protection and it will still need it after the call to self.conn.query.

added in response to comment:

That's a fair point that "must mean QMutexLocker is not usable at all" which I did miss. I assume you are referring to PySide.QtCore.QMutexLocker which makes the unlikely claim:

Now, the mutex will always be unlocked when the PySide.QtCore.QMutexLocker object is destroyed (when the function returns since locker is an auto variable).

It is unlikely because there is no such thing as an auto variable storage class in Python. I suspect this will, upon further investigation, prove to be a "let's just wrap a C++ library and assume the scoping semantics work". If this guess is correct you might feasibly use the with statement to better guarantee reliable unlocking.

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Thanx, I was afraid it was this way as Python is GC-ed. However as I mentioned this makes the whole idea of a QMutexLocker kinda worthless, as the point of it is to not have to worry about unlocking. Also it seems to work when Im not throwing exceptions, which is kinda strange. Should have the same problem there regarding not knowing when the lock is deleted? –  Rolle Jun 29 '12 at 12:58
    
I feel this answer is a bit general and skirts around the correct information, and just makes assumptions. There is no question that QMutexLocker is usable, when used properly. But I do fully agree about only locking the critical code sections to minimize the lock. –  jdi Jun 30 '12 at 3:43
    
agreed, I was just guessing, which is why I upvoted your answer. –  msw Jun 30 '12 at 3:45
    
I think your answer is on to something in the way you touch on the different between the C++ object and the PyQt wrapped version. And also the garbage collection vs "auto" –  jdi Jun 30 '12 at 3:53
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You aren't using the QMutexLocker properly. Use it like a context manager:

from PyQt4.QtCore import QMutex, QMutexLocker

def bad_lock(aLock):
    locker = QMutexLocker(aLock)
    print "Locked"
    raise RuntimeError("Test exception")

    return "Should not get here"

def good_lock(aLock):
    with QMutexLocker(aLock):
        print "Locked"
        raise RuntimeError("Test exception")

    return "Should not get here"

lock = QMutex()

bad_lock(lock)
print lock.tryLock()
# False

lock.unlock()

good_lock(lock)
print lock.tryLock()
# True

In the test, you see in the first example, the lock returns still locked. In the second, when the exception is raised, the context manager releases the lock before leaving the function.

When used in C++, I am sure the QMutexLocker does what it is supposed to, unlocking whenever the scope ends. But in Python, as you have discovered, the garbage collector should not be relied upon to do the unlocking. Context managers via the with statement are perfect for this. You can tell by the way the C++ examples of this class show it simply being created at the top of the function. Whereas the python version has both an __enter__ and __exit__ method.

Lastly, the with context lets you wrap the critical code blocks in a lock to limit the amount of the the lock needs to be in place, so you can do something like this:

def good_lock(aLock):

    # do a bunch of stuff here
    ...

    # critical section
    with QMutexLocker(aLock):
        # do critical stuff here
        ...

    # do other stuff here
    ...

    return True
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Nice, never knew it was such a great thing as a with statement in Py –  Rolle Jul 1 '12 at 9:40
    
@Rolle: apparently not as nice as the other answer on here, huh? ;-) That one told you QMutexLocker wasn't reliable. –  jdi Jul 1 '12 at 15:03
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