Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is it possible to return the last row of a table in MS SQL Server. I am using an auto increment field for the ID and i want to get the last one just added to join it with something else. Any idea?

Here's the code:

const string QUERY = @"INSERT INTO Questions (ID, Question, Answer, CategoryID, Permission) " 
                   + @"VALUES (@ID, @Question, @Answer, @CategoryID, @Permission) "; 

using (var cmd = new SqlCommand(QUERY, conn)) 
{ 
    cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@Question", question); 
    cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@Answer", answer); 
    cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@CategoryID", lastEdited);
    cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@Permission", categoryID);
    cmd.ExecuteNonQuery(); 
}
share|improve this question

7 Answers 7

up vote 18 down vote accepted

using an auto increment field ... and i want to get the last one just added to join it with something else.

The key here is "just added". If you have a bunch of different users hit the db at the same time, I don't think you want user A to retrieve the record created by user B. That means you probably want to use the scope_identity() function to get that id rather than running a query on the table again right away.

Depending on the context you might also need @@identity (would include triggers) or ident_current('questions') (limited to a specific table, but not the specific scope). But scope_identity() is almost always the right one to use.


Here's an example:

DECLARE @NewOrderID int

INSERT INTO TABLE [Orders] (CustomerID) VALUES (1234)

SELECT @NewOrderID=scope_identity()

INSERT INTO TABLE [OrderLines] (OrderID, ProductID, Quantity) 
    SELECT @NewOrderID, ProductID, Quantity
    FROM [ShoppingCart]
    WHERE CustomerID=1234 AND SessionKey=4321


Based on the code you posted, you can do something like this:

// don't list the ID column: it should be an identity column that sql server will handle for you
const string QUERY = "INSERT INTO Questions (Question, Answer, CategoryID, Permission) " 
                   + "VALUES (@Question, @Answer, @CategoryID, @Permission);"
                   + "SELECT scope_identity();"; 

int NewQuestionID;
using (var cmd = new SqlCommand(QUERY, conn)) 
{ 
    cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@Question", question); 
    cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@Answer", answer); 
    cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@CategoryID", lastEdited);
    cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@Permission", categoryID);
    NewQuestionID = (int)cmd.ExecuteScalar(); 
}

See my answer to another question here:
http://stackoverflow.com/questions/590927/get-new-sql-record-id/591030#591030

The problem now is that you'll likely want subsequent sql statements to be in the same transaction. You could do this with client code, but I find keeping it all on the server to be cleaner. You could do that by building a very long sql string, but I tend to prefer a stored procedure at this point.

I'm also not a fan of the .AddWithValue() method — I prefer explicitly defining the parameter types — but we can leave that for another day.

Finally, it's kind of late now, but I want to emphasize that it's really better to try to keep this all on the db. It's okay to run multiple statements in one sql command, and you want to reduce the number of round trips you need to make to the db and the amount of data you need to pass back and forth between the db and your app. It also makes it easier to get the transactions right and keep things atomic where they need to be.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for mentioning scope_identity() is almost always the right one to use. –  RichardOD Jul 14 '09 at 15:48
    
im surprised nobody mentioned identity_current, I posted some links and examples –  Stan R. Jul 14 '09 at 15:48
    
but scope identity gets me back a column of null values i want the last one not the count? just added: the previous lines of codes were the ones that added this new row –  Ahmad Farid Jul 14 '09 at 16:00
    
Don't include scope_identity() in the query. You run it after adding your new row and save the result in a variable, which you can then use to make the 'join', if that's even still required. Gimme a moment and I'll have an edit that demonstrates this. –  Joel Coehoorn Jul 14 '09 at 16:06
    
TSQl code line 5: SELECT @NewOrderID=scope_identit() Should be: SELECT @NewOrderID=scope_identity() letter y is missing. –  Holly Styles Jul 14 '09 at 16:15

Not safe - could have multiple inserts going on at the same time and the last row you'd get might not be yours. You're better off using SCOPE_IDENTITY() to get the last key assigned for your transaction.

share|improve this answer
1  
Excellent point. When I posted I just read "gimme the last row". I ignored his intention to use it to create a foreign key reference. –  Randolpho Jul 14 '09 at 15:31
    
+1 for providing the correct solution –  dotjoe Jul 14 '09 at 15:32
    
+1: Correct if the client doesn't start a new transaction. –  Philippe Leybaert Jul 14 '09 at 15:32
    
+1 very good point..now i wish people wouldn't downvote me because i misread the question. –  Stan R. Jul 14 '09 at 15:33
1  
+1. I was surprised (and worried) yours was the only answer that used this. –  RichardOD Jul 14 '09 at 15:35

use

  • scope_identity() returns the last identity value generated in this session and this scope
  • ident_current() returns the last identity value generated for a particular table in any session and any scope

    select ident_current( 'yourTableName' )

will return the last identity created by a different session.

Most of the time you should use scope_identity() right after an insert statement like so.

--insert statement
SET @id = CAST(SCOPE_IDENTITY() AS INT)
share|improve this answer
    
.........booo :( –  Stan R. Jul 14 '09 at 15:31
    
Stan I didn't downvote- but it is OK to delete answers! –  RichardOD Jul 14 '09 at 15:36
1  
just edit your answer to stop the downvotes. hint: No one actually provided the tsql for using scope_identity(). –  dotjoe Jul 14 '09 at 15:37
1  
i edited my answer, to reflect more of what the user is asking for. –  Stan R. Jul 14 '09 at 15:44
1  
+1 and i didn't even know about ident_current(). –  dotjoe Jul 14 '09 at 15:51
select top 1 * from yourtable order by id desc
share|improve this answer
    
Be careful. This looks right at first glance, but if you read the question closely there are problems with it. –  Joel Coehoorn Jul 14 '09 at 15:33
1  
True, but the question is not entirely clear. "joining with" could also mean finding related records to the last one in the table. –  Philippe Leybaert Jul 14 '09 at 15:34
    
-1 this will return the last insert by any user, not the current's user last insert –  Remus Rusanu Jul 14 '09 at 16:44
    
@Remus Rusanu: Nowhere in the question was there any mention that it should return the current user's last insert. But if you think my answer is wrong, your downvote was deserved I guess. –  Philippe Leybaert Jul 14 '09 at 16:54
    
He says the he wants to join 'the one just added' with something else after an insert, like in typical master-detail inserts. It would be highly unusual to want to get a random row inserted by some other user. –  Remus Rusanu Jul 14 '09 at 17:09

I'm not sure of your version of SQL Server, but look for the OUTPUT clause of ther INSERT statement. You can capture a set of rows with this clause

share|improve this answer

Since the questioner is using .NET, here's a modified example of how to do it. (I removed ID from the insert list since it's autoincrement--the original example would fail. I also assume ID is an SQL int, not a bigint.)

        const string QUERY = @"INSERT INTO Questions (Question, Answer, CategoryID, Permission) "
                           + @"VALUES (@Question, @Answer, @CategoryID, @Permission);"
                           + @"SELECT @ID = SCOPE_IDENTITY();";

        using (var cmd = new SqlCommand(QUERY, conn)) 
        { 
            cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@Question", question); 
            cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@Answer", answer); 
            cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@CategoryID", lastEdited);
            cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@Permission", categoryID);
            cmd.Parameters.Add("@ID", System.Data.SqlDbType.Int).Direction = ParameterDirection.Output;
            cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();

            int id = (int)cmd.Parameters["@ID"].Value;
        }

EDITED: I also suggest considering LINQ to SQL instead of hand-coding SqlCommand objects--it's much better (faster to code, easier to use) for many common scenarios.

share|improve this answer

With a simple select you can do something like this:

SELECT *
FROM table_name
WHERE IDColumn=(SELECT max(IDColum) FROM table_name)
share|improve this answer
    
unsafe in a concurrent environment...... –  marc_s Jul 14 '09 at 15:44

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.