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I need to create a trigger in oracle 11g for auditing a table .

I have a table with 50 columns that need to be audited.

  • For every new insert into a table ,i need to put an entry in audit table (1 row).
  • For every update ,suppose i update 1st 2nd column ,then it will create two record in audit with its old value and new value .

structure of audit table will be

 id        NOT NULL
 attribute NOT NULL
 OLD VALUE NOT NULL
 NEW VALUE NOT NULL
 cre_date  NOT NULL
 upd_date  NULL
 cre_time  NOT NULL
 upd_time  NULL

In case of insert ,only the primary key (main table)i.e the id and cre_date and cre_time need to be populated and attribute equal to * ,in case of update ,suppose colA and colB is updating then all need to be populated.In this case two records will be created with attribute of first record colA and corresponding old and new value , and same for the colB

Now my solution to audit is not very optimized , i have created a row level trigger ,which will check for each and every 50 columns for that table whether it is been changed or not based on its new and old value(if -else) , and it will populate the audit table . I am not satisfied with my soltuion thats why i am posting here. Another solution which i have seen in the link below :

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1421645/oracle-excluding-updates-of-one-column-for-firing-a-trigger

This is not working in my case , I have done a POC for that as shown below:

create table temp12(id number);

create or replace trigger my_trigger
after update or insert on temp12
for each row
declare
  TYPE tab_col_nt IS table of varchar2(30);

  v_tab_col_nt tab_col_nt;

begin
 v_tab_col_nt := tab_col_nt('id','name');

   for r in v_tab_col_nt.first..v_tab_col_nt.last
   loop
      if updating(r) then
         insert into data_table values(1,'i am updating'||r);
      else
      insert into data_table values(2,'i am inserting'||r);
      end if;
   end loop;

 end;

In case of updating it is calling the else part i don't know why . Can this be possible through compound trigger

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Your immediate problem with the else always being called is because you're using your index variable r directly, rather than looking up the relevant column name:

for r in v_tab_col_nt.first..v_tab_col_nt.last
loop
    if updating(v_tab_col_nt(r)) then
        insert into data_table values(1,'i am updating '||v_tab_col_nt(r));
    else
        insert into data_table values(2,'i am inserting '||v_tab_col_nt(r));
    end if;
end loop;

You're also only showing an id column in your table creation, so when r is 2, it will always say it's inserting name, never updating. More importantly, if you did have a name column and were only updating that for a given id, this code would show the id as inserting when it hadn't changed. You need to split the insert/update into separate blocks:

if updating then
    for r in v_tab_col_nt.first..v_tab_col_nt.last loop
        if updating(v_tab_col_nt(r)) then
            insert into data_table values(1,'i am updating '||v_tab_col_nt(r));
        end if;
    end loop;
else /* inserting */
    for r in v_tab_col_nt.first..v_tab_col_nt.last loop
        insert into data_table values(2,'i am inserting '||v_tab_col_nt(r));
    end loop;
end if;

This will still say it's inserting name even if the column doesn't exist, but I assume that's a mistake, and I guess you'd be trying to populate the list of names from user_tab_columns anyway if you really want to try to make it dynamic.


I agree with (at least some of) the others that you'd probably be better off with an audit table that takes a copy of the whole row, rather than individual columns. Your objection seems to be the complication of individually listing which columns changed. You could still get this information, with a bit of work, by unpivoting the audit table when you need column-by-column data. For example:

create table temp12(id number, col1 number, col2 number, col3 number);
create table temp12_audit(id number, col1 number, col2 number, col3 number,
    action char(1), when timestamp);

create or replace trigger temp12_trig
before update or insert on temp12
for each row
declare
    l_action char(1);
begin
    if inserting then
        l_action := 'I';
    else
        l_action := 'U';
    end if;

    insert into temp12_audit(id, col1, col2, col3, action, when)
    values (:new.id, :new.col1, :new.col2, :new.col3, l_action, systimestamp);
end;
/

insert into temp12(id, col1, col2, col3) values (123, 1, 2, 3);
insert into temp12(id, col1, col2, col3) values (456, 4, 5, 6);
update temp12 set col1 = 9, col2 = 8 where id = 123;
update temp12 set col1 = 7, col3 = 9 where id = 456;
update temp12 set col3 = 7 where id = 123;

select * from temp12_audit order by when;

        ID       COL1       COL2       COL3 A WHEN
---------- ---------- ---------- ---------- - -------------------------
       123          1          2          3 I 29/06/2012 15:07:47.349
       456          4          5          6 I 29/06/2012 15:07:47.357
       123          9          8          3 U 29/06/2012 15:07:47.366
       456          7          5          9 U 29/06/2012 15:07:47.369
       123          9          8          7 U 29/06/2012 15:07:47.371

So you have one audit row for each action taken, two inserts and three updates. But you want to see separate data for each column that changed.

select distinct id, when,
    case
        when action = 'I' then 'Record inserted'
        when prev_value is null and value is not null
            then col || ' set to ' || value
        when prev_value is not null and value is null
            then col || ' set to null'
        else col || ' changed from ' || prev_value || ' to ' || value
    end as change
from (
    select *
    from (
        select id,
            col1, lag(col1) over (partition by id order by when) as prev_col1,
            col2, lag(col2) over (partition by id order by when) as prev_col2,
            col3, lag(col3) over (partition by id order by when) as prev_col3,
            action, when
        from temp12_audit
    )
    unpivot ((value, prev_value) for col in (
        (col1, prev_col1) as 'col1',
        (col2, prev_col2) as 'col2',
        (col3, prev_col3) as 'col3')
    )
)
where value != prev_value
    or (value is null and prev_value is not null)
    or (value is not null and prev_value is null)
order by when, id;

        ID WHEN                      CHANGE
---------- ------------------------- -------------------------
       123 29/06/2012 15:07:47.349   Record inserted
       456 29/06/2012 15:07:47.357   Record inserted
       123 29/06/2012 15:07:47.366   col1 changed from 1 to 9
       123 29/06/2012 15:07:47.366   col2 changed from 2 to 8
       456 29/06/2012 15:07:47.369   col1 changed from 4 to 7
       456 29/06/2012 15:07:47.369   col3 changed from 6 to 9
       123 29/06/2012 15:07:47.371   col3 changed from 3 to 7

The five audit records have turned into seven updates; the three update statements show the five columns modified. If you'll be using this a lot, you might consider making that into a view.

So lets break that down just a little bit. The core is this inner select, which uses lag() to get the previous value of the row, from the previous audit record for that id:

        select id,
            col1, lag(col1) over (partition by id order by when) as prev_col1,
            col2, lag(col2) over (partition by id order by when) as prev_col2,
            col3, lag(col3) over (partition by id order by when) as prev_col3,
            action, when
        from temp12_audit

That gives us a temporary view which has all the audit tables columns plus the lag column which is then used for the unpivot() operation, which you can use as you've tagged the question as 11g:

    select *
    from (
        ...
    )
    unpivot ((value, prev_value) for col in (
        (col1, prev_col1) as 'col1',
        (col2, prev_col2) as 'col2',
        (col3, prev_col3) as 'col3')
    )

Now we have a temporary view which has id, action, when, col, value, prev_value columns; in this case as I only have three columns, that has three times the number of rows in the audit table. Finally the outer select filters that view to only include the rows where the value has changed, i.e. where value != prev_value (allowing for nulls).

select
    ...
from (
    ...
)
where value != prev_value
    or (value is null and prev_value is not null)
    or (value is not null and prev_value is null)

I'm using case to just print something, but of course you can do whatever you want with the data. The distinct is needed because the insert entries in the audit table are also converted to three rows in the unpivoted view, and I'm showing the same text for all three from my first case clause.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for good explanation , i never think of that this can be done with unpivot ,but a question is this be optimized because there are millions of transactions taking place in a day , if i call this query then will this be optimized ? other than using simple if-else in trigger –  Gaurav Soni Jul 2 '12 at 6:45

Why not make life easier and insert the entire row when any data in any column is updated. So any update (or delete typically) on the main table has the original row copied to the audit table first. So your audit table will have same layout as the main table, but with an extra few tracking fields, something like:

create or replace trigger my_tab_tr
before update or delete
on my_tab
referencing new as new and old as old
for each row
declare
  l_type varchar2(3);
begin
  if (updating) then
    l_type = 'UPD';
  else
    l_type = 'DEL';
  end if;

insert into my_tab_audit(
 col1,
 col2,
 audit_type,
 audit_date) 
values (
 :old.col1,
 :old.col2,
 l_type,
 sysdate
);
end;

Add additional columns as you like to the audit table, this is just a typical example

share|improve this answer
    
:but how can i track this on column level ,in my update query i could have 50 columns or only one column ,and i need this from GUI .In your soltuion you are tracking only old and new value not the column name ,which i have mentioned attribute in my example –  Gaurav Soni Jun 29 '12 at 13:00
    
:This can be done easily with 50 if -else for each column ,but i just want to do this only updated columns only. –  Gaurav Soni Jun 29 '12 at 13:01
    
@GauravSoni the simplicity of this approach is that you would track any and all changes to your main table, whether its 1 column's data changing or 50 columns. For example, you can query the audit table for UPD types (updates), based on a certain date range, and see what has changed over time. –  tbone Jun 29 '12 at 13:22

The only way I've seen field-by-field audits done is to check each of the fields :OLD and :NEW values against each other and write the appropriate records to the audit table. You can semi-automate this by having a subroutine in the trigger to which you pass the appropriate values, but one way or another I believe you're going to have to write code for each individual field. Unless someone else has a brilliant way to do this with some sort of reflective API of which I'm not aware (and "what I'm not aware of" is applicable to more stuff each day, or so it seems :-).

The choice of whether to audit individual fields or to audit the entire row (which I usually call "history" tables) depends on how you intend to use the data. In this case, where individual fields changes need to be reported, I agree that a field-by-field audit seems to be a better fit. In other cases (for example, where a data extract must be reproducible for any given date) a row-by-row audit or "history table" approach is a better fit.

Irregardless of the the audit level (field-by-field or row-by-row), the comparison logic needs to be carefully written to handle the NULL/NOT NULL cases, so that you don't get bitten by comparing :OLD.FIELD1 = :NEW.FIELD1 where one of the values (or both) is NULL, and end up not taking the appropriate action because NULL is not equal to anything, even itself. Don't ask me how I know... :-)

Just out of curiosity, what will be put in for OLD_VALUE and NEW_VALUE in the single row which will be created when an INSERT occurs?

Share and enjoy.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 @Bob, I believe you are correct, the only way to test for changes made by an update (within an UPDATE FOR EACH ROW trigger) is to compare the :NEW.col and :OLD.col values. (Unless, of course, as you carefully note, Oracle has made some incredible changes or introduced an amazing new API). I also concur with your comments about the "row" history being a more appropriate approach in some cases. Really good answer. –  spencer7593 Jun 29 '12 at 14:34
    
@spencer7593 - thank you for your kind comments (and upvote :-). This gave me a chance to re-read this answer, and in doing so I realized I forgot to point out the importance of handling the NULL/NOT NULL cases in the test logic, so I edited the answer to include this. –  Bob Jarvis Jul 1 '12 at 13:23

the way i like to do it:

  1. create an audit table that is parallel to your existing original table.
  2. add a timestamp and user columns to this audit table.
  3. whenever the original table is inserted or updated, then just insert into the audit table.
  4. the audi table should have a trigger to set the timestamp and user values - all other values come in as the new values.

then you can query at any time who did what, and when.

share|improve this answer
    
:I need to access this audit table from GUI ,and based on that i need to show result based on column level change ,so this design will be non optimized when i compare the old value and new value in case of calling it from front end –  Gaurav Soni Jun 29 '12 at 12:55
    
it is just a single query... but up to you. –  Randy Jun 29 '12 at 15:14

A very unorthodox solution: (only if you have access to system tables, at least the SELECT privilege)

  1. You know your table's NAME. Identify the ID of the owner of the table. Look it up in SYS.USER$ by the user's (=owner's) name.

  2. Look up your table's object-ID (= OBJ#) in SYS.OBJ$ by OWNER# (= owner's ID) and NAME (=table's name).

  3. Look up the columns that compose the table in SYS.COL$ by OBJ#. You will find all the columns, their IDs (COL#) and names (NAME).

  4. Write an UPDATE trigger with a cursor that moves on the set of those columns. You will have to write the nucleus of the loop only once.

  5. and end of it: I don't provide code, because the details may differ from Oracle version to Oracle version.

This is real dynamic SQL programming. I happened to use it even on fairly large enterprise systems (the team leaders did not know about it) and it worked. It is fast and reliable. Drawbacks: {privileges; transportability; bad consideration from responsible people}.

share|improve this answer
    
Why would you look at those underlying SYS tables rather than the user_tab_colums or all_tab_columns views? The first three steps could be a simple query against one of those views, surely, and wouldn't have the permission issues? –  Alex Poole Sep 16 at 11:51

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