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I would like to know how to copy all content of a file (server.log) to a new file and removing the content from original file by using Linux commands. Actually it is easy to to that. But I actually want to be sure there will not be content update within that operations. Following Linux commands do what i want, but I have to be sure there is no change in server.log between command1-command2 execution.

command1: #cp server.log serverNew.log 
command2: #truncate -l 0 server.log
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5 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted
+50

I would use a tool especially built for this purpose instead of using some ad hoc solution.

Take a look at logrotate. You can use the command directly or set it up in a cron job.

It's supports compression, running command after each rotation, rotating based on size or time etc...

Based on your comment below I assume you are interested in these options:

postrotate/endscript

The lines between postrotate and endscript (both of which must appear on lines by themselves) are executed (using /bin/sh) after the log file is rotated. These directives may only appear inside a log file definition. Normally, the absolute path to the log file is passed as first argument to the script. If sharedscripts is specified, whole pattern is passed to the script. See also prerotate. See sharedscripts and nosharedscripts for error handling.

prerotate/endscript

The lines between prerotate and endscript (both of which must appear on lines by themselves) are executed (using /bin/sh) before the log file is rotated and only if the log will actually be rotated. These directives may only appear inside a log file definition. Normally, the absolute path to the log file is passed as first argument to the script. If sharedscripts is specified, whole pattern is passed to the script. See also postrotate. See sharedscripts and nosharedscripts for error handling.

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You are right. Special tool should be used. my solution is that # cp server.log serverNew.log; truncate -s 0 server.log But after created serverNew.log file i am going to zip and sign it. –  mmc18 Jun 29 '12 at 13:36
    
So does logrotate give me the name of file created newly or does it do additioanl operations such as zipping and running additional script? –  mmc18 Jun 29 '12 at 14:00
    
It has many many options. Just look at the man pages for logrotate, man logrotate. –  Eric des Courtis Jun 30 '12 at 1:18
    
Added some info for you in my answer. :) –  Eric des Courtis Jun 30 '12 at 1:31
    
Thanks, that is it :) –  mmc18 Jul 2 '12 at 6:22
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Don't copy, do a rename (with mv). The rename is atomic at the file system level, so any application writing a file with the old name will not collide.

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I have to keep the original file since thie file is used by an application say Glassfish. If i remove or move it even create a new one with same name, Application does not write its output –  mmc18 Jun 29 '12 at 13:11
    
@mmc18 That means that the application still has the file open, and it's quite possible it might continue appending to the mved file, even though the name is different (in which case your approach in the original question might also not work as expected). If you truly want to avoid losing any entries, you'll have to shut down the app, then mv/cp/touch as necessary, then restart the app. Or use logrotate to do it automatically for you on a scheduled basis. –  twalberg Jun 29 '12 at 13:23
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After that you can use touch command to make sure

command3: #touch server.log
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You can use those command in tandem: cp oldFile newFile; cat '' >> oldFile
cp copy your file. The second command, that is executed afert the first, is use for overwriting the original file

Obviously if your "program" (or script) that will run once you copy the content of old file into new one, open the file in write (and not in write and append) the second command isn't necessary.
Moreover for >> redirection, you have to verify that the noclobber option is setted to "off" (1)

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I have to keep the orojinal file since thie file is used by an application say Glassfish. If i remove it even create a new one with same name, Application does not write its output. –  mmc18 Jun 29 '12 at 13:10
    
@Levon : now is ok –  DonCallisto Jun 29 '12 at 13:13
    
@mmc18 take a look to my update –  DonCallisto Jun 29 '12 at 13:14
    
cat '' >> oldFile appends nothing to oldFile. cat (obviously) fails to open the nameless file, so nothing is appended. echo -n '' > oldFile would empty oldFile. –  Cobra_Fast Aug 9 '12 at 10:40
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Here is a simple C application that will (probably) do what you want:

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <sys/file.h>

void main (int argc, char** argv)
{
    if (argc != 2)
        exit(1);

    FILE* fi = fopen(argv[1], "rb+");
    FILE* fo = fopen(argv[2], "wb");

    if (fi != NULL && fo != NULL && flock(fi, LOCK_EX) == 0)
    {
        while (feof(fi) == 0)
        {
            char* buf = malloc(4096);
            int bRead = 0;
            bRead = fread(buf, 1, 4096, fi);
            fwrite(buf, 1, bRead, fo);
        }

        frewind(fi);
        fputc(10, fi);

        flock(fi, LOCK_UN);
        fclose(fi);
        fclose(fo);
    }
else exit(1);

exit(0);
}

Call like: ./a.out oldfile newfile

Warning: I have not actually tested this code, be sure to do some testing before you use this for any kind of important work.

Alternatively, you could also try something with the shell-tool flock: http://linux.die.net/man/1/flock

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