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I know this is possible but my inexperience with C++ limits me. What I want to do is have some system were I can add update() methods to certain classes and have all the update methods in the program be called every frame.

Unity3D users may be familiar with this. But how does the program know to call every Update() method when there are an undetermined amount of them in undetermined classes.

I suppose it is a system to dynamically call functions throughout the program.

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You could write a separate thread with a queue. When enough things are on the queue then you send a signal that would call the update method. –  Alex W Jun 29 '12 at 13:25
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6 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Derive all the classes that have this Update method from an abstract class, then put pointers to all the variables for which you want this method to be called in some kind of vector.

Here's a rudimentary example:

class Updatable
{
public:
    virtual void update() = 0;
};

class SomeClass : public Updatable
{
public:
    virtual void update()
    {
        printf("update for SomeClass was called\n");
    }
};

class AnotherClass : public Updatable
{
public:
    virtual void update()
    {
        printf("update for AnotherClass was called\n");
    }
};

int main()
{
    Updatable* v[10];
    int n = 0;
    SomeClass a, b;
    AnotherClass c, d;
    v[n++] = &a;
    v[n++] = &b;
    v[n++] = &c;
    v[n++] = &d;

    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
        v[i]->update();
}
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There is no magic wand that will do this for you. You need to manually maintain a list of all objects you have created that have this Update method and whenever the need arises iterate over the list calling the method on each object in turn.

Additionally, you must satisfy the compiler's requirements before it will allow you to do this. This means that if the list is actually a standard container such as std::vector, it needs to be a container of pointers to some base class shared by all instances inside it (this is the standard approach). There are approaches that will let you get around this limitation, but you should have a very very good idea of what you are doing before resorting to such.

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That was my original plan, but I have used game engines which do not require you to manage a list of methods. Its all done automatically –  Constan7ine Jun 29 '12 at 13:24
3  
@DavidC Under the hood, those engines do exactly that (or something very similar), though. –  jrok Jun 29 '12 at 13:25
    
Cool, thanks. So the engine just holds a dynamic array of methods to call? –  Constan7ine Jun 29 '12 at 13:34
    
@DavidC: Not exactly. Typically it holds some kind of container (could be an array, but not necessarily) of pointers to objects that are of a class that implements this method, or descendants of that class. –  Jon Jun 29 '12 at 13:37
1  
If you have to derive from a class Object to get the Update method then the Object constructor is probably where the object gets registered. –  Peter Wood Jun 29 '12 at 13:45
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What you are looking for is very similar to the Observer pattern. You would need to register your objects to have their "notify"(or update) method called when some action occurred. That action could be a timer or every loop, that's up to you.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Observer_pattern will give you a good over view of this design pattern.

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I've put this here for a proof of concept. If you inherit from Updateable: you can call UpdateModule::Update(delta_time); from your main loop to update any constructed classes.

It uses a looped linked list to track which items to update this prevents the need for dynamic memory allocation. The UpdateModule uses a trick to make sure that it will work even with statically created objects:

class Updatable
{
    friend class UpdateModule;
public:
    virtual void Update(float delta_time) = 0;
protected:
    Updatable();
    virtual ~Updatable();
private:
    Updatable* m_next;
    Updatable* m_prev;
};


class UpdateModule
{
    friend class Updatable;
public:
    static void Update(float delta_time)
    {
        Updatable* head = *GetHead();
        Updatable* current = head;
        if (current)
        {
            do
            {
                current->Update(delta_time);
                current = current->m_next;
            } while( current != head);
        }
    }
private:

    static void AddUpdater(Updatable* updatable)
    {
        Updatable** s_head = GetHead();
        if (!*s_head)
        {
            updatable->m_next = updatable;
            updatable->m_prev = updatable;
        }
        else
        {
            (*s_head)->m_prev->m_next = updatable;
            updatable->m_prev = (*s_head)->m_prev;
            (*s_head)->m_prev = updatable;
            updatable->m_next = (*s_head);
        }
        *s_head = updatable;    
    }

    static void RemoveUpdater(Updatable* updatable)
    {
        Updatable** s_head = GetHead();
        *s_head = updatable->m_next;
        if (*s_head != updatable)
        {
            updatable->m_prev->m_next = updatable->m_next;
            updatable->m_next->m_prev = updatable->m_prev;
        }
        else
        {
            *s_head = NULL;
        }
        updatable->m_next = NULL;
        updatable->m_prev = NULL;
    }
private:
    static Updatable** GetHead()
    {
        static Updatable* head = NULL;
        return &head;
    }
};


Updatable::Updatable() : m_next(NULL), m_prev(NULL)
{
    UpdateModule::AddUpdater(this);
}

Updatable::~Updatable()
{
    UpdateModule::RemoveUpdater(this);
}

Sample usage:

class SomeClass : private Updatable
{
public:
    virtual void Update(float)
    {
        printf("update for SomeClass was called\n");
    }
};

class AnotherClass : private Updatable
{
public:
    virtual void Update(float)
    {
        printf("update for AnotherClass was called\n");
    }
};

int main()
{
    SomeClass a, b;
    AnotherClass c, d;
    UpdateModule::Update(0);
}
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The only solution for resolving this I can think of is using something like AspectC++. Aspect oriented programming is very usefull when you want to do stuff like this.

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One fun way using the CRTP (Curiously Recurring Template Pattern):

template <class T> struct updatable
{
    static std::set<updatable*> objects;

    updatable()
    {
        objects.insert(this);
    }

    ~updatable()
    {
        objects.erase(this);
    }

    void update_all()
    {
        for (auto& o : objects)
            static_cast<T* const>(o)->update();
    }
};

template <class T>
std::set<updatable<T>*> updatable<T>::objects = {};

struct Some_object : updatable<Some_object>
{
    void update()
    {
        // logic here.
    }
};

Now you can update any one object using the .update() method. But you can also update all objects of a certain type by invoking the .update_all() method inherited from the parent. Note: I haven't tested this code for bugs yet, but the gist of it is there.

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