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I'm currently trying to fix a memory leak within my application (it's not showing up using the leaks tool), so I'm using the heapshot function of the Allocations instrument. I have taken several heapshots as shown below:

heapshots

The action I am performing is changing views from a normal menu -> one containing an MKMapView (with an overlay) and back again.

I have checked and the memory is increasing every time I enter the MKMapView. I declare the MKMapView once upon initialisation, and the view containing the MKMapView is never released until the end of the application cycle. So it shouldn't be a creation issue.

If I go into one of the heapshots I can see the following:

Broken down heapshots

and each of the memory addresses look like the following:

Memory address

I can't seem to figure out why so many QuartzCore overhead is being left, let alone why it's being created each time the view is being shown. Can anyone tell me if there is a way to see what object is directly calling this, or which object is retaining it? This is creating enough of a memory leak to eventually crash my app but I cannot seem to fix it.

EDIT:

Okay here is some of my code (it's a big code so will try show selective bits):

First in the menu this is called when the map button is pressed:

[self presentModalViewController:[dictionaryViews objectForKey:kMapView] animated:NO];

This then loads the map up, where the code called is as follows:

- (void)viewDidAppear:(BOOL)animated
{
    if (self.mkMapView)
    {
        [self changeMapOverlay:14];

    Singleton *singleton = [Singleton sharedSingleton];

    if ([singleton.storyLocation isEqualToString:kGunthorpe])
    {
        CustomAlertView *alert = [[CustomAlertView alloc] initWithTitle:@"Map" message:@"Once you are ready to visit your first location touch the green pin and press the play button. If you are walking the streets use the directions tab to guide you." delegate:self cancelButtonTitle:@"Okay" otherButtonTitles:nil];
        [alert show];
        [alert release];

        //int i =0;
    }

    // Setup for 30 fps
    float fps = 1.0 / 30.0;
    self.timerMap = [NSTimer scheduledTimerWithTimeInterval:fps target:self selector:@selector(mapLoop) userInfo:nil repeats:YES];  
}
}

This then calls the changeOverlay function which does the following:

if (!self.mkMapOverlay)
    {
        MapOverlay *mapOverlay = [[MapOverlay alloc] init];
        [self.mkMapView addOverlay:mapOverlay];
        self.mkMapOverlay = mapOverlay;
        [mapOverlay release];

        mkOverlayRect = MKMapRectMake([self.mkMapOverlayView.overlay boundingMapRect].origin.x, [self.mkMapOverlayView.overlay boundingMapRect].origin.y, [self.mkMapOverlayView.overlay boundingMapRect].size.width, [self.mkMapOverlayView.overlay boundingMapRect].size.height);
    }
    else 
    {
        [self.mkMapOverlayView setHidden:FALSE];
    }

This is called to make sure the map uses the overlay as the default view (it can change to hybrid and normal). - I've checked and the mapOverlay only gets called the first time as I never change the map type.

To exit the map you have to click a detailDisclosureButton on a map pin, which calls the following code:

- (void)mapView:(MKMapView *)mapView annotationView:(MKAnnotationView *)view calloutAccessoryControlTapped:(UIControl *)control
{
//NSLog(@"Annotation view selected - Start");
MapAnnotation *annotation = (MapAnnotation *)view.annotation;
NSString *locationName = [[NSString alloc] initWithString:[NSString stringWithString:annotation.title]];

if ([annotation.title rangeOfString:@"."].location != NSNotFound) 
{
    NSRange range = [locationName rangeOfString:@". "];
    int test = range.location + range.length;

    NSString *locationName2 = [[NSString alloc] initWithString:[locationName substringFromIndex:test]];

    [[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] 
     postNotificationName:@"GotoLocation" 
     object:locationName2];

    [locationName2 release];
    locationName2 = nil;
}

[locationName release];
locationName = nil;

[mapView deselectAnnotation:annotation animated:NO];

[self dismissModalViewControllerAnimated:NO];
//NSLog(@"Annotation view selected - Finish");
}

I can explain any of the above code, but basically the annotations have a title which I need to strip numbers off to go to the correct location.

share|improve this question
    
You need to post some code, perhaps the pieces that make this "The action I am performing is changing views from a normal menu -> one containing an MKMapView (with an overlay) and back again." happen. –  trumpetlicks Jun 29 '12 at 13:48
    
also you can try static memory analyser to first track for static leaks. Run Xcode -> Product -> Analyze. –  rishi Jun 29 '12 at 13:54
    
Hi, I've amended my post above to include code. Will have a look for static leaks, thanks for the advice! –  Elliott D'Alvarez Jun 29 '12 at 14:12
    
Okay, I have looked at the static memory analyser and looks like I'm doing a lot wrong, I think it's my use of self. when releasing things. Can you tell me if the following code is okay: if (self.scrollDirections) { [self.scrollDirections removeFromSuperview]; [self.scrollDirections release]; self.scrollDirections = nil; } –  Elliott D'Alvarez Jun 29 '12 at 14:17
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1 Answer 1

I don't program on Mac, but this is extremely suspicious:

I have checked and the memory is increasing every time I enter the MKMapView. I declare the MKMapView once upon initialisation, and the view containing the MKMapView is never released until the end of the application cycle. So it shouldn't be a creation issue.

Are you REALLY sure that it's NOT constructing this object every time, and you are destroying it only when the program quits? It seems to be a classical object lifetime confusion.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi, I've updated my original post. I'm pretty sure it's not being created twice unless I'm getting confused. I'm checking the general creation properties of the map and that's not being called again. –  Elliott D'Alvarez Jun 29 '12 at 14:12
    
Just LOG the constructor and check if it's being called twice. –  Spidey Jun 29 '12 at 15:30
    
I am logging the constructor and have set break points in it, so it's definitely not being called twice. I can't really track down what is keeping reference to these things (some have a ref count of 5). All the de constructors are being called at the end, and no constructor should be called during as it's a view change / dismissal. –  Elliott D'Alvarez Jul 2 '12 at 10:14
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