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Until now, I have been writing a Node class as

class Node {
        private  value;
        private Node left;
        private Node right;

        public int getValue() {
            return value;
        }

        public void setValue(int value) {
            this.value = value;
        }

        public Node getLeft() {
            return left;
        }

        public void setLeft(Node left) {
            this.left = left;
        }

        public Node getRight() {
            return right;
        }

        public void setRight(Node right) {
            this.right = right;
        }
    } 

and Binary Search Tree as

public class BinarySearchTree {
    private Node root;

    public BinarySearchTree(int value) {
        root = new Node(value);
    }

    public void insert(int value) {
      Node node = new Node(value);
        // insert logic goes here to search and insert
    }
}

Now I would like to support BinarySearchTree to have insert node of any type like strings, people

How can I make it generic to hold any type?

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1  
What have you tried? Have you researched java generics and do you know about the <T> syntax? –  Colin D Jun 29 '12 at 14:07

5 Answers 5

Use generics:

class Node<T extends Comparable<T>> {
        private T value;
        ...
}

public class BinarySearchTree<T extends Comparable<T>> {
    private Node<T> root;

    public BinarySearchTree(T value) {
        root = new Node<T>(value);
    }

    public void insert(T value) {
      Node<T> node = new Node<T>(value);
        // insert logic goes here to search and insert
    }
}
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1  
Downvoter - please explain:) –  Petar Minchev Jun 29 '12 at 14:12
2  
There's a serial downvoter around here. –  Tudor Jun 29 '12 at 14:13
    
@Tudor - "Nice", thanks for the information:) –  Petar Minchev Jun 29 '12 at 14:14
1  
Dunno who is the down voter, but pay attention that you must enforce T to extend comparable, otherwise it will be impossible to implement the comparison code. –  Yair Zaslavsky Jun 29 '12 at 14:14
    
@zaske - Good point, I will add it. –  Petar Minchev Jun 29 '12 at 14:15

Please not your code does not compile.
You have a few challenges here -
A. Define Node as Generic -

public class Node<T> {
   private T value;
   //... here goes the rest of your code
}

B. Your search class also should be generic, and the signature should be

public class BinarySearchTree <T extends Comparable<T>> {

   public BinarySearchTree(T value) {
      //Do your logic here
   }

   public void insert(T value)  {
        //Do your logic here
   }
}

This is required in order to enforce you to provide only types that implement Comparable so you will be able to perform the search in the tree.

share|improve this answer
    
Good point that it has to be Comparable. –  CosmicComputer Jun 29 '12 at 14:18
    
I think the node has to extend comparable too!!! –  trumpetlicks Jun 29 '12 at 14:22
    
@trumpetlicks - No. There is no code inside the class of Node that needs methods of Comparable. Of course, When using BinaryTreeSearch, there will be no way to create Nodes of classes that do not implement Compparable. –  Yair Zaslavsky Jun 29 '12 at 16:37

Just make each of the Node and BinarySearchTree classes generic:

class Node<T extends Comparable<T>> {
    private T value;
    private Node<T> left;
    private Node<T> right;

    public Node(T value) {
        this.value = value;
    }

    public T getValue() {
        return value;
    }

    public void setValue(T value) {
        this.value = value;
    }

    public Node<T> getLeft() {
        return left;
    }

    public void setLeft(Node<T> left) {
        this.left = left;
    }

    public Node<T> getRight() {
        return right;
    }

    public void setRight(Node<T> right) {
        this.right = right;
    }
} 

and:

class BinarySearchTree<T extends Comparable<T>> {
    private Node<T> root;

    public BinarySearchTree(T value) {
        root = new Node<T>(value);
    }

    public void insert(T value) {
      Node<T> node = new Node<T>(value);
        // insert logic goes here to search and insert
    }
}

Note the Comparable extension constraint that you will need later to enforce node ordering in the tree. Thanks to zaske for the suggestion.

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Hey what's will all the downvoting here? –  Tudor Jun 29 '12 at 14:13
2  
You must enforce T to extend comparable, or to provide Comprable<T> at the CTOR, otherwise you will not be able to perform the search. –  Yair Zaslavsky Jun 29 '12 at 14:13
    
Good suggestion. –  Tudor Jun 29 '12 at 14:14

You have two options:

1) You can get into generics/templates.

2) Have your tree take in a type Object instead of int and have the user be responsible for casting.

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2  
option 2 is a poor choice. –  Colin D Jun 29 '12 at 14:08

Regaring second question you should use Template :

http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/articles/javase/generics-136597.html

Regarding first :

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Binary_search_algorithm http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tree_rotation (insert)

Maybe that's faster read:

http://www.roseindia.net/java/java-get-example/java-binary-tree-code.shtml

Good study!

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