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The original code was somehow complex, i simplify it as:

Given:

  1. list of class instance, e.g.: l=[c1,c2,c3, ...]
  2. each instance has a member variable list, e.g. c1.memList=[3,2,5], c2.memList=[1,2]

Todo: select those instances in l, whose memList has only '3'-modulo item , e.g, c3.memList=[3,6,9,3,27]

I thought to code it like this:

newl = [ n for n in l if len( [m for m in n.memList if m%3] )==0 ]

But: list comprehension does not allow this by saying 'm is not defined'

Question: how to code this in a pythonic way?

New edit: Sorry I made a typo (mistyped if to in), it worked. I will propose to close this question.

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2  
This looks Pythonic enough to me, and it works just fine. Can you provide more context, maybe including the definition of the class you're using? –  Joe Friedl Jun 29 '12 at 14:36

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I did not get any Error concerning 'm is not defined' the reasons must be outside of this snippet.

newl = [ n for n in l if all([ m % 3 == 0  for m in n.memList]) ]

I would recommend something like this, the all() function improves readability. It is allways good to use the list Syntax cause it speeds calculations.

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The code you have given works for me! I'm not sure what problem you are having. However, I would write my list comprehension a bit differently:

[n for n in l if not any(m % 3 for m in n.memList)]

Tested:

>>> class Obj(object):
...     def __init__(self, name, a):
...         self.name = name
...         self.memList = a
...     def __repr__(self):
...         return self.name
...     
>>> objs = [Obj('a', [3, 2, 5]), Obj('b', [3, 6, 9, 3, 27])]
>>> [n for n in objs if not any(m for m in n.memList if m % 3)]
[b]
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This I think is what you are looking for. It is much more verbose than your method, but python emphasizes readability.

    class c(object):
    def __init__(self, memlist):
        self.m = memlist


    c1 = c([3,6,9])
    c2 = c([1,5,7])
    l = [c1,c2]
    newl = []
    for n in l:
        b = True
        for x in n.m:
            if x % 3 != 0:
                b = False
        if b != False:
            newl.append(n)
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Here is what I've got, with

c1.memList = [0, 1, 2, 3]
c2.memList = [0, 1]
c3.memList = [0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27]

and this code:

for y in l:
    newl = []
    for m in y.memList:
        if m%3 == 0:
            newl.append(m)
    print newl

I get this as a result:

[0, 3]
[0]
[0, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, 21, 24, 27]
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I think he only wants to return instances of the class where the entire list is populated with n % 3 == 0 items, not reduce the items in the lists. –  Justin.Wood Jun 29 '12 at 14:51

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