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Consider the following code:

struct Foo
{
    Foo operator+(const Foo &rhs) const;
    // notice lack of: Foo operator*(const Foo &rhs) const;
};

template <class T>
struct Bar
{
    T x, y;
    T add() const { return x + y; }
    T mul() const { return x * y; }
};

I have two questions:

  1. Can I inherit from Bar<Foo> and override mul() to something meaningful?

  2. Can I inherit from Bar<Foo> without overriding mul() if I never use mul() anywhere?

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted
  1. sure
  2. sure

Templates are really a kind of smart preprocessor, they're not compiled. If you don't use something, you can write complete (syntactically correct) rubbish, i.e you may inherit from

template <class T>
struct Bar
{
    T x, y;
    T add() const { return x + y; }
    T mul() const { return x.who cares what-s in here; }
};

P.S. since your + operator is used in a const function, it should be declared as const too.

EDIT: OK, not all compilers support this, here's one that compiles with gcc:

template <class T>
struct Bar
{
    T x, y;
    T add() const { return x + y; }
    T mul() const { T::was_brillig & T::he::slith(y.toves).WTF?!0:-0; }
};
share|improve this answer
    
you're right about the const, I was just quickly typing something up without much thought (it's not actual code) – Matt Jun 29 '12 at 14:59
    
Although that example won't compile; as you say, the uninstantiated function must still be syntactically correct. – Mike Seymour Jun 29 '12 at 15:20
    
@MikeSeymour, added one that will – panda-34 Jun 29 '12 at 16:39
  1. Bar<Foo>::mul() isn't a virtual function, so it cannot be overridden.

  2. Yes, if you don't use a template member function then it does not get instantiated and you don't get any errors that would result from instantiating it.

You can hide Bar<Foo>::mul() by providing a function of the same signature in a subclass, and because of 2, Bar<Foo>::mul() won't be instantiated. However this is probably not a good practice. Readers are likely to get confused about the hiding vs. overriding, and there's not much benefit to doing this over simply using a different function name and never using mul(), or providing an explicit specialization of Bar for Foo.

share|improve this answer
    
A member function does not have to be virtual to be overridden. It only needs to be virtual if you are using polymorphism (i.e. calling it from a pointer to a base class). – Matt Jun 29 '12 at 14:39
1  
@Matt If the function is not virtual then it's not being overridden, it's being hidden. – bames53 Jun 29 '12 at 14:42
    
You can call it whatever you want, that is just a matter of semantics. – Matt Jun 29 '12 at 14:44
    
@Matt no it's not, the base class's version still exists. Please read the standard on this issue. – Seth Carnegie Jun 29 '12 at 14:56
    
@SethCarnegie since when did overriding mean overwriting? The English word 'override' does not imply that what is overridden no longer exists. – Matt Jun 29 '12 at 14:58

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