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I have an interface that has a generic method with two type parameters. I want to partially explicitly implement that generic method in a class. Is this possible? Some example code below:

public interface ISomeInterface
{
    TResultType Results<TResultsType,TSearchCriteriaType>(TSearchCriteriaType searchCriteria);
}

public class SomeConcrete : ISomeInterface
{
    public TResultsType Results<TResultsType, ConcreteSearchCriteria>(ConcreteSearchCriteria searchCriteria)
{
    return (TResultsType)Results;
}
}

Do I have to explicitly implement both type parameters to make this work?

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It's not exactly clear what you're asking here. Your class and your interface both aren't generic, so I'm not sure what you mean by "implementing" both type parameters... Are you referring to the compiler inferring the type? Something else? –  Reed Copsey Jun 29 '12 at 15:15
    
@ReedCopsey I'm trying to explicitly implement the generic method with types further down the inheritance hierarchy. The only problem is I don't want to explicitly call out types for both type parameters, only one of them (namely TSearchCriteriaType). –  theMothaShip Jun 29 '12 at 15:19
    
Okay - I think I understand - put in an answer for you, but the short answer is you can't do what you have above ;) –  Reed Copsey Jun 29 '12 at 15:24

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Do I have to explicitly implement both type parameters to make this work?

In order to implement this interface, your class must allow ANY types to be used for that method. (Any types which fit the constraints defined in the interface, which, in this case, since there are no constraints, means any type.)

You can't restrict the interface within a specific class implementing it, since this is a generic method (not a generic type), and there is no constraints which cause this to work properly.

In order to do what you wish, I think, you'd need to make the interface generic:

public interface ISomeInterface<TSearchCriteriaType>
{
    TResultType Results<TResultsType>(TSearchCriteriaType searchCriteria);
}

You can then implement it as:

public class SomeConcrete : ISomeInterface<ConcreteSearchCriteria>
{ 
    public TResultsType Results<TResultsType>(ConcreteSearchCriteria searchCriteria)
    {
         var results = GenerateResults();
         return (TResultsType)results;
    }
}

By making the interface generic on the search criteria, you allow your class to implement it based on a specific type for the search criteria.

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:) this is how I had it before and thus ran into a co-variance problem in a different part of the code... I think its time to step back and rethink my design in general. Thanks for the input! –  theMothaShip Jun 29 '12 at 15:26
    
I just think you should have removed the TSearchCriteriaType type parameter from the Results method. In the concrete class, ConcreteSearchCriteria is actually a type parameter shadowing the real class with the same name, not the class itself. –  Jordão Jun 29 '12 at 15:26
    
From your example, you can declare interface ISomeInterface<in TSearchCriteriaType> to solve your variance problems. (your real code may not be so simply solved) –  Tim S. Jun 29 '12 at 15:28
    
@Jordão You're right - fixed it –  Reed Copsey Jun 29 '12 at 15:28

I think this is what you're looking for:

public class SomeConcrete : ISomeInterface
{
    TResultsType ISomeInterface.Results<TResultsType, TSearchCriteriaType>(TSearchCriteriaType searchCriteria)
    {
        return Results<TResultsType>((ConcreteSearchCriteria)(object)searchCriteria);
    }
    public TResultsType Results<TResultsType>(ConcreteSearchCriteria searchCriteria)
    {
        // return something
    }
}

Note that this will fail at run time, though the compiler can see no problems:

ISomeInterface someInterface = new SomeConcrete();
var result = someInterface.Results<object, SomeOtherSearchCriteria>(null);

More generally, you're no longer implementing the interface as might be expected. You might want to make it ISomeInterface<TResultsType, TSearchCriteriaType>, then make SomeConcrete<TResultsType> : ISomeInterface<TResultsType, ConcreteSearchCriteria>. That way you are implementing the interface as expected, declaring it all strongly.

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This is what I figured to be the case, I just wanted to make sure I wasn't missing something. This basically boils down to a co-variance problem. Thanks! –  theMothaShip Jun 29 '12 at 15:22

You can't specialize a generic method like that. If it's generic in the interface, it has to be generic in the implementing classes. If you move the type parameters to the interface itself, then you can do it (and you can also have variance annotations, making it covariant in the result type and contravariant in the search criteria type):

public interface ISomeInterface<out TResultsType, in TSearchCriteriaType> {
  TResultsType Results(TSearchCriteriaType searchCriteria);
}

public class SomeConcrete<TResultsType> : 
  ISomeInterface<TResultsType, ConcreteSearchCriteria> {
  public TResultsType Results(ConcreteSearchCriteria searchCriteria) {
    ...
  }
}

Now your class is generic on the result type.

You can also have a class specialized in a certain result type, and generic in the criteria type:

public class IntSearcher<TSearchCriteriaType> : 
  ISomeInterface<int, TSearchCriteriaType> {
  public int Results(TSearchCriteriaType searchCriteria) {
    ...
  }
}

I think this is a more consistent design, since both generic parameters are at the same level (and it looks like they should go together). But only you can say whether this is better for your code or not.

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Yes, I think you do, otherwise you are not directly implementing the interface.

Your Implementation is not as generic as the interface contract.

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