Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I hope I worded the title accurately enough but I typically use Java and don't have much experience in Web Development/PHP/CodeIgniter. I have a difficult time understanding the life cycle of a script as I found out trying to implement a certain feature to a website I am developing (as a means of learning how to). I'll first describe the feature I tried implementing and then the problem I ran into that made me question my fundamental understanding of how scripts work since I'm used to typical OOP.

Ok so here goes...

I have a webpage that has 2 basic tasks a user can do, create and delete an entry. What I attempted to implement was a way to time a user how long it takes them to complete a certain task. The way I did this was have a homepage where there would be a list of tasks a user to choose from (in this case 2, create and delete). A user would click a task which would link to the 'true' homepage where the user then would be expected to complete the task. My script looks like this:

<?php

class Site extends CI_Controller {

var $task1;
var $tasks = array(
                        "task1" => NULL,
                        "date1" => 0,
                        "date2" => 0,
                        "diff" => 0);

function __construct()
{
    parent::__construct();
    include 'timetask.php';
    $this->task1 = new TimeTask("create");      
}   

function index() 
{   
    $this->tasks['task1'] = $this->task1->getTask();
    $this->tasks['diff'] = $this->task1->getTimeDiff();

    if($this->tasks['diff'] == NULL)
    {
            $this->tasks['diff'] = 0;
    }   

    $this->load->view('usability_test', $this->tasks);
}

function origIndex() 
{   
    $this->task1->setDate1(new DateTime());
    $this->tasks['date1'] = $this->task1->getDate1()->getTimestamp();
    $data = array();

    if($q = $this->site_model->get_records())
    {
        $data['records'] = $q;
    }

    $this->load->view('options_view', $data);
}

function create()
{
    $this->task1->setDate2(new DateTime());
    $this->tasks['date2'] = $this->task1->getDate2()->getTimestamp();

    $data = array(
            'author' => $this->input->post('author'),
            'title' => $this->input->post('title'),
            'contents' => $this->input->post('contents')
    );  

    $this->site_model->add_record($data);
    $this->index();

}

I only included create to keep it short. Then I also have the TimeTask class, that actually another StackOverflow so kindly helped me with:

<?php

class TimeTask
{
private $task;

/**
 * @var DateTime
 */
private $date1, $date2;

function __construct($currTask) 
{
    $this->task = $currTask;
}

public function getTimeDiff() 
{
    $hasDiff = $this->date1 && $this->date2;
    if ($hasDiff) {
        return $this->date2->getTimestamp() - $this->date1->getTimestamp();
    } else {
        return NULL;
    }
}

public function __toString() 
{
    return (string) $this->getTimeDiff();
}

/**
 * @return \DateTime
 */
public function getDate1()
{
    return $this->date1;
}

/**
 * @param \DateTime $date1
 */
public function setDate1(DateTime $date1)
{
    $this->date1 = $date1;
}

/**
 * @return \DateTime
 */
public function getDate2()
{
    return $this->date2;
}

/**
 * @param \DateTime $date2
 */
public function setDate2(DateTime $date2)
{
    $this->date2 = $date2;
}

/**
 * @return get current task
 */
 public function getTask()
 {
        return $this->task;
 }

}

?>

I don't think posting the views is necessary for the question but here is atleast how the links are made.

<?php echo form_open('site/create');?>
...and...
<?php echo anchor("site/delete/$row->id", $row->title); ?>

Now there's no error in the code but it doesn't do what I expect of it and the reason I assume why is because that each time a function of the script is called via a new page it is NOT the same instance of the script called previously so any previously created objects are no longer there. This confuses me and leaves me quite unsure of how to implement this gracefully. Some ways I would guess of how to do this is by passing the necessary data through the URL or have data saved in a database and retrieve it later to compare the times. What would be a recommended way to do, not just this, but anything that needs previously created data? Also, am I correct to think that a script is only 'alive' for one webpage at a time? Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
As you can probably tell, my mind is too rooted in OOP so any help is appreciative –  Pete Jodo Jun 29 '12 at 15:22
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Web development is a bit different to "standard" development - principally because of the nature of HTTP. Each request to the web application has to travel across the network using HTTP, which, as all web developers know, is stateless. What this means is that web servers do not have to remember anything about previous HTTP requests. Usually, webdevs get round this using cookies in one way or another - where a cookie is some bit of data, coded as a text string, which is sent back to the browser so that it can resend it to the application on the next request. Like that, a cookie is a kind of transferable memory.

So, each time you make a request, unless you transfer some data using a cookie (either an HTTP cookie, or what is sometimes called a URL cookie - state data coded in the URL), it looks to the web application like a brand new request, unrelated to any past request. So, for your application to work, you need to use a cookie in some way to remember or recover the start time when you detect that the user has finished a task. You can either (i) use CI's built-in facilities for remembering data (flashdata, as mentioned above, or userdata from the CI Session class - see http://codeigniter.com/user_guide/libraries/sessions.html), which are built on top of CI cookies), (ii) do this using your own cookie data (not recommended - why use the framework in that case?), or (iii) use hidden form fields - an oldie but sometimes goldie technique that requires the PHP script generating a view to write hidden form fields whose values are the data you want to remember and have sent back to you on the next request.

This kind of problem is something you'll come across again and again in web development - so get to know the problem and its solutions well!

share|improve this answer
    
This is exactly the answer I was looking for, a generic explanation followed by a direction to a solution. thanks so much! –  Pete Jodo Jun 29 '12 at 17:27
add comment

You can use flashdata to make data available for next server request.

Reference: http://codeigniter.com/user_guide/libraries/sessions.html

share|improve this answer
    
Awesome! thanks for the direct –  Pete Jodo Jun 29 '12 at 15:45
add comment

You can go the extra step with sessions and implement the database table to store the current sessions. This gives you the ability to validate the id and confirm it's a valid session and not an old session accidentially restored via modded cookies for example.

It's very straight forward.

Create the table:

CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS  `ci_sessions` (
session_id varchar(40) DEFAULT '0' NOT NULL,
ip_address varchar(45) DEFAULT '0' NOT NULL,
user_agent varchar(120) NOT NULL,
last_activity int(10) unsigned DEFAULT 0 NOT NULL,
user_data text NOT NULL,
PRIMARY KEY (session_id),
KEY `last_activity_idx` (`last_activity`)

);

Modify the config file(application/config/config.php):

$config['sess_use_database'] = TRUE;
$config['sess_table_name'] = 'ci_sessions';

And then, use the standard methods to set and get the values.

Here is the guide: CI User Guide - Session Class

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.