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I need to know the exact difference between:

<form method="POST" action="https://mywebsite/signon.php">
<input name="harv_acc" value="940322903" type="hidden" />
<input name="harv_eml" value="a@b.com" type="hidden" />
<input type="submit" value="SignOn" />

and

var url = "https://mywebsite/signon.php";
$.ajax({
    url: url,
    type: 'POST',
    //dataType: 'html', -- this was something I tried later
    //data: "harv_acc=" + accountnumber + "&harv_eml=" + email , this is also what I tried last but below is what I tried first
    data: { harv_acc: account, harv_eml: email },
    success: function (data) {
        closePopup("div_PleaseWait");
        alert(data);
        //window.location = encodeURI('<%= Url.Action("DownloadDocument", "Documents") %>?DocumentID=' + documentID + '&DownloadType=' + downloadType + '&DownloadPath=' + data);
    }
});

When I post the latter I get a 200 but no response. If I submit the first one I get the correct response.

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How are you returning data back from the file. You need to echo the output in your php file to get the response in ajax. –  Sabari Jun 29 '12 at 15:16
    
They look darn similar to me. What is the correct response? –  Matchu Jun 29 '12 at 15:17
    
@Cptcecil Can you post your php code –  Sabari Jun 29 '12 at 15:21
    
I do not have access to the php code, I'm posting to another site. I suppose I could ask them for it though. That would be rather helpful. –  Dale Marshall Jun 29 '12 at 15:23
    
@Cptcecil Security prevents cross domain ajax requests. Thats why you are getting no response –  Sabari Jun 29 '12 at 15:28
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5 Answers 5

up vote 13 down vote accepted

From the comments:

I'm posting to another site

Aha! There's your issue. Browsers block AJAX to external websites for security reasons. Sorry, but you're not going to issue that request via an XHR request.

If the other website wants you to communicate with them, they could expose this part of the site via JSON-P, which works something like this:

  1. My site adds <script src="http://othersite.com/signon.js?username=foo&password=bar&callback=myCallback"> to the source code (yeah, it's messy to use GET for this, but JSON-P can't work any other way), and creates a function named myCallback to handle the response data.
  2. The other site signs in, then returns something like myCallback({success: false, errorMessage: "Incorrect password, try again!"})
  3. That script is run on my site, calls myCallback, and everything is happy.

JSON-P is a powerful protocol, but only works if the remote site agrees to it. Still, if they do, jQuery has a nice shortcut for it: just set dataType: "jsonp" and it will handle the whole callback thing for you.

But if you're not closely involved with this website, that's unlikely to happen, and you'll probably just be stuck with having to give up on this kind of cross-site interaction. Sorry, but this kind of cross-domain policy is critical to online security. (I don't want other sites issuing requests to bankofamerica.com on my behalf, kthx.)

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2  
Great answer and nice spot! –  Second Rikudo Jun 29 '12 at 15:31
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when using POST method you should ,in your case, Post your data as JSON

var url = "https://mywebsite/signon.php";
$.ajax({
    url: url,
    type: 'POST',
    dataType: 'html',
    data: {
      harv_acc : accountnumber,
      harv_eml : email
    },
    success: function (data) {
        closePopup("div_PleaseWait");
        alert(data);
        //window.location = encodeURI('<%= Url.Action("DownloadDocument", "Documents") %>?DocumentID=' + documentID + '&DownloadType=' + downloadType + '&DownloadPath=' + data);
    }
});

NOTE : i used dataType : JSON

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2  
Similarly to the other answer: dataType does not refer to the type of data, but rather the type of data we expect in the response. While it may be a stupid naming decision by the jQuery team, it's at least well-documented. Additionally, data can be a query string—in fact, if we give it the data in object form, jQuery will convert it to the corresponding query string. Still, the original version in the question isn't properly encodeURIComponent'd, so this could actually fix something. –  Matchu Jun 29 '12 at 15:23
    
ok i missed that ... i'll fix it –  MhdSyrwan Jun 29 '12 at 15:26
    
i said "you should " not you must !! –  MhdSyrwan Jun 29 '12 at 15:28
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Try sending ther data as a key:value object. This is an example from the jQuery docs

    $.ajax({
  type: "POST",
  url: "some.php",
  data: { name: "John", location: "Boston" }
}).done(function( msg ) {
  alert( "Data Saved: " + msg );
});

Update: as user Matchu pointed out, this is not the problem, as the data will be converted into a query string anyway, as stated in the jQuery docs:

"The data option can contain either a query string of the form key1=value1&key2=value2, or a map of the form {key1: 'value1', key2: 'value2'}. If the latter form is used, the data is converted into a query string using jQuery.param() before it is sent. "

So yeah, some rash answering on my part there. At least I learned something! ;)

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The first parameter passed to your complete function will be a jqXHR object, which is a wrapper around the browser's XMLHttpRequest object. A more convenient way to handle the response is to use the done method:

var url = "https://mywebsite/signon.php";
$.ajax({
    url: url,
    type: 'POST',
    dataType: 'html',
    data: "harv_acc=" + accountnumber + "&harv_eml=" + email
}).done(function(data) {
    closePopup("div_PleaseWait");
    alert(data);
});
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Well, this would be the problem without the cross-domain issue! –  Joe Friedl Jun 29 '12 at 15:29
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Cross domain ajax requests are not supported by browser. But there is another way to get around this.

You can use JSONP for cross-domain requests. It is easy to use and allows you to request anything (as long as it is in JSON format) from any server/script that supports the callback. The good thing about JSONP is that it works in older browsers too.

The only serious limitation seems to be that it always uses the HTTP GET method

Can you please check with this too.

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