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I am trying to write some simple code which will read a text file but reads the first line twice. I thought this would be as simple as something like this

    std::ifstream file;
    file.open("filename", std::ios_base::in);
    std::string line;
    std::getline(file, line);
    // process line
    file.seekg(0, ios::beg);

    while (std::getline(file, line))
    {
        // process line
    }

However the seekg must fail as the first line is not processed twice. Any idea why?

PLEASE NOTE: This is not the problem I am faced with but a simplified version of it so as not to have to paste multiple classes code and multiple functions. The real problem involves a file pointer being passed to multiple functions in multiple classes. The first function may or may not be called and reads the first line of the file. The second function reads the whole file but must first call seekg to ensure we are at the beginning of the file.

I just used the code above to simplify the discussion.

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3  
The first std::getline call probably sets the eof flag. –  ildjarn Jun 29 '12 at 15:38
1  
@ildjarn It does, but it's not the problem. seekg clears the eof flag before it does anything else. And getline for char* sometimes sets failbit, but not the std::string overload. Also, I verified the problem… –  Potatoswatter Jun 29 '12 at 15:48
    
@Potatoswatter : "seekg clears the eof flag before it does anything else" I wasn't aware of that offhand, thanks. :-] –  ildjarn Jun 29 '12 at 15:49
    
@ildjarn Well I'm intrigued so I just looked it up. Not offhand knowledge, of course ;v) –  Potatoswatter Jun 29 '12 at 15:50
    
@Potatoswatter: seekg clears only eofbit, not any other failure bit (which might be the problem here). And that too, in C++11 only, not in C++03. –  Nawaz Jun 29 '12 at 15:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Rather than seeking back to the beginning and reading the first line twice, I think I'd approach things with something like:

std::ifstream file("filename");

std::string line;

std::getline(file, line);
process(line);

do { 
    process(line);
} while (getline(file, line));

At the moment, this assumes that process doesn't modify line (but if needed, it's easy enough to make an extra copy of it for the first call).

Edit: given the modified requirements in the edited answer, it sounds like the seek is really needed. That being the case, it's probably cleanest to clear the stream before proceeding:

std::getline(file, line);
process1(line);

file.seekg(0);
file.clear();

process2(file);
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1  
No I can't do that. I hugely simplified the code so as not to drag out what is a far more complex process. In reality, the file pointer is being passed to different functions. One function must read the first line of the file only. The other function must read again from the beginning of the file and doesn't know if the first function was performed or not as it is an optional stage. I didn't want to paste a huge amount of code so just simplified the issue with the code above. –  Jonnster Jun 29 '12 at 15:59
2  
In that case, rather than downvoting a valid answer, you should edit the question to reflect your real needs. –  Jerry Coffin Jun 29 '12 at 16:01
    
Fair point. Edit the answer and I can re-click. –  Jonnster Jun 29 '12 at 16:07
    
@Jonnster: I've done a bit of editing that may provide a bit more help. –  Jerry Coffin Jun 29 '12 at 16:25
    
The clear function does indeed fix the problem. Thanks. –  Jonnster Jul 2 '12 at 14:33

Ideally your code should look like this:

std::ifstream file("filename"); //no need of std::ios_base::in

if ( file ) //check if the file opened for reading, successfully
{
   std::string line;
   if ( !std::getline(file, line) )
   {
        std::cerr << "read error" << std::endl;
        return;
   }

   // process line

   if ( !file.seekg(0, ios::beg) )
   {
        std::cerr << "seek error" << std::endl;
        return;
   }

   while ( std::getline(file, line) )
   {
      // process line
   }
}
else
{
   std::cerr << "open error" << std::endl;
}
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Wrote a test program… it does not report any state bits ever being set. –  Potatoswatter Jun 29 '12 at 16:11
    
@Potatoswatter: then, as you said, it is a bug in the library, and my answer simply says how the code should look like, ideally. –  Nawaz Jun 29 '12 at 16:14
1  
Yeah, your code is exemplary. I'm just mentioning what the output is in this case. –  Potatoswatter Jun 29 '12 at 16:18
1  
I was being an idiot, I was checking cin.rdstate not file.rdstate — see the deleted answer. This is indeed the correct answer, and the difference in library behavior is probably due to a C++11 feature (clearing eofbit, as @ildjarn mentioned) making it into C++03 mode, or else if that behavior is due to a DR and not strictly just C++11. –  Potatoswatter Jun 29 '12 at 16:32

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