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I tried linq to remove duplicate item:

   var MyItems = (from b in this.result
               select new Item{ Name = b.Name, ID = b.ID }).Distinct();

The I checked the result, it is not removed the duplicated items. How to resolve this problem?

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2  
Duplicate by which criteria? Have you done an override of Equals in Item? – Tudor Jun 29 '12 at 15:46
2  
Define "Duplicate" in this context - same ID? You will probably have to provide an equality comparer. – Jon Egerton Jun 29 '12 at 15:46
    
Thanks, guys. Working now after override Equals and GetHashCode. – KentZhou Jun 29 '12 at 15:54

By default, Distinct() uses EqualityComparer<T>.Default, which has the following rules:

The default equality comparer, Default, is used to compare values of the types that implement the IEquatable generic interface. To compare a custom data type, you need to implement this interface and provide your own GetHashCode and Equals methods for the type.

In your case, this means Item needs to implement IEquatable<Item>.

Alternatively, you can use the overload of Distinct which takes an IEqualityComparer<T> directly.

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You can pass Distinct() a comparer object:

var MyItems = (from b in this.result
           select new Item{ Name = b.Name, ID = b.ID }).Distinct(new ItemComparer());

Here is an example of the custom comparer class

// Custom comparer for the Item class
class ItemComparer: IEqualityComparer<Product>
{
    // Items are equal if their names and IDs are equal.
    public bool Equals(Item x, Item y)
    {

        //Check whether the compared objects reference the same data.
        if (Object.ReferenceEquals(x, y)) return true;

        //Check whether any of the compared objects is null.
        if (Object.ReferenceEquals(x, null) || Object.ReferenceEquals(y, null))
            return false;

    //Check whether the items' properties are equal.
    return x.ID == y.ID && x.Name == y.Name;
    }

    // If Equals() returns true for a pair of objects 
    // then GetHashCode() must return the same value for these objects.

    public int GetHashCode(Item item)
    {
        //Check whether the object is null
        if (Object.ReferenceEquals(item, null)) return 0;

        //Get hash code for the Name field if it is not null.
        int hashItemName = item.Name == null ? 0 : item.Name.GetHashCode();

        //Get hash code for the ID field.
        int hashItemID = item.ID.GetHashCode();

        //Calculate the hash code for the item.
        return hashItemName ^ hashItemID;
    }

}
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As you're comparing objects, not primitives, you're going to have to do some work to define what Distinct means.

Have a look at the Distinct override that includes IEqualityComparer: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb338049.aspx

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Regular Distinct() returns elements from a collection by using the default equality comparer.

You can use custom comparer for this:

// modified example from docs, not tested
class MyComparer : IEqualityComparer<Item>
{
    // Items are equal if their ids are equal.
    public bool Equals(Item x, Item y)
    {

        // Check whether the compared objects reference the same data.
        if (Object.ReferenceEquals(x, y)) return true;

        // Check whether any of the compared objects is null.
        if (Object.ReferenceEquals(x, null) || Object.ReferenceEquals(y, null))
            return false;

        //Check whether the items properties are equal.
        return x.ID == y.ID;
    }

    // If Equals() returns true for a pair of objects 
    // then GetHashCode() must return the same value for these objects.

    public int GetHashCode(Product product)
    {
        //Check whether the object is null
        if (Object.ReferenceEquals(item, null)) return 0;

        //Get hash code for the ID field.
        int hashProductId = product.ID.GetHashCode();

        return hashProductId;
    }

}

var myItems = (from b in this.result
               select new Item{ Name = b.Name, ID = b.ID }).Distinct(new MyComparer());
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Since I don't know how you're using the Items after this, I'm gambling here.

If really only need the ID-Name pair, you can use an anonymous type and get the comparison for free:

var MyItems = (from b in this.result
               select new { b.Name, b.ID }).Distinct();

After this (and once again assuming all you need is the Name-ID pair), the resulting object will have properties you need:

foreach(var item in MyItems)
    Console.WriteLine("{0} -> {1}", item.ID, item.Name);

Quoting MSDN on C# Anonymous Types:

Because the Equals and GetHashCode methods on anonymous types are defined in terms of the Equals and GetHashcode methods of the properties, two instances of the same anonymous type are equal only if all their properties are equal.

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You need add new items to List, use foreach exam:

foreach(var _item in result.Distinct()){
//Code here
}

ok :)

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Not OK :( ........ – L.B Jun 29 '12 at 16:03
    
you are unlucky. it's good with me – Nguyễn Văn Thắng Jun 29 '12 at 16:09

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