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I am performing a great deal of inserts from a detail table into a summary table within SQL Server. I am currently using LEFT OUTER JOINs to determine if the row from the detail table already exists in the summary table prior to inserting it like the example below:

INSERT INTO TableA
       (columnA
       ,columnB
       ,columnC)
SELECT 
    b.columnA, 
    b.columnB, 
    b.columnC
FROM TableB b
    LEFT OUTER JOIN TableA a
        on a.columnA = b.columnA
WHERE
    a.columnA IS NULL 

I've found that this method takes a considerable amount of time even if there are no rows to insert because it has to compare all rows to determine what already exists. In this scenario I would normally consider adding a flag to TableB to say what rows have been inserted.

However there are several different scenarios for a row in TableB to be inserted into TableA which would require several flags and I would prefer not to use the storage space as TableB is VERY LARGE and getting LARGER.

Thanks for any advice.

share|improve this question
    
Did you try to use the merge statements instead? I think sql-server does some additional optimization when using that instead. – mfussenegger Jun 29 '12 at 16:34
1  
Can you also show PKs and indexes on these tables? – Damir Sudarevic Jun 29 '12 at 16:39
up vote 3 down vote accepted
INSERT INTO TableA (columnA, columnB, columnC)
SELECT 
    b.columnA, 
    b.columnB, 
    b.columnC
FROM TableB as b
where not exists (select 1 from TableA as xx where xx.columnA = b.columnA) ;
share|improve this answer
    
Wow, good suggestion. I altered one of my smaller scripts that currently has no records to insert but previously still took almost 3 minutes to run and after applying your method it took 1 second. Thanks! Guess I didn't fully understand the "exists" keyword. – Troy Jun 29 '12 at 16:53

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