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I want to parse an integer accurately, one that has been potentially formatted according to the current locale. If I didn't parse the integer accurately, I want to know it. So I use:

String string = "1111122222333334444455555";
Locale locale = Locale.getDefault();
NumberFormat numberFormat = NumberFormat.getIntegerInstance(locale);
numberFormat.setParseIntegerOnly();
Number number = numberFormat.parse(string);

Obviously "1111122222333334444455555" represents a big number, bigger than a Long can handle. So NumberFormat gives me... a Double??

I guess I would have expected to receive a BigInteger rather than a Double, especially since I asked for an integer-specific number formatter. But never mind that; the bigger problem is that the double value I get back is 1.1111222223333344E24! This is not equal to 1111122222333334444455555!!

If NumberFormat gives me a parsed value that does not equal that stored in the input string, how do I detect that?

Put another way: "How can I know if the Double value I get back from NumberFormat is exactly equivalent to the integral value represented in the original string?"

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1  
If you use the simple Long.parseLong(), you'll get an overflow exception. –  Marko Topolnik Jun 29 '12 at 16:34
1  
Why not simply construct a BigInteger with the input string instead of trying to parse it? –  Conor Sherman Jun 29 '12 at 16:36
    
@MarkoTopolnik, I need to support values that have been possibly formatted in the current local (e.g. "1,234" in the USA). I have updated the question to reflect this. –  Garret Wilson Jun 29 '12 at 16:38
    
@ConorSherman In most cases I'm working with Long. I don't want to be forced into using BigInteger unless the number requires it. Plus the BigInteger constructor doesn't pay attention to locale (see updated question). –  Garret Wilson Jun 29 '12 at 16:40
    
You cold still consider it. If you need to validate that it conforms to the locale rules, that's one thing, but you can still parse it easily by filtering out everything but digits. –  Marko Topolnik Jun 29 '12 at 16:44

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The javadocs for parse() state that it will return a Long if possible, otherwise it will return a Double. So just check that the return value is a Long.

"Returns a Long if possible (e.g., within the range [Long.MIN_VALUE, Long.MAX_VALUE] and with no decimals), otherwise a Double."

"How can I know if the Double value I get back from NumberFormat is exactly equivalent to the integral value represented in the original string?"

If it returns a Double, then it is not exactly equivalent to your integral value because a Double cannot accurately represent values at that magnitude. Concrete example:

  Number a = numberFormat.parse("-9223372036854775809"); // Integer.MIN_VALUE - 1
  Number b = numberFormat.parse("-9223372036854775810"); // Integer.MIN_VALUE - 2
  System.out.println((a.equals(b))); // prints "true"
  Number c = numberFormat.parse("-9223372036854776800");
  System.out.println((a.equals(c))); // prints "true"
share|improve this answer
    
My title wasn't quite clear enough. What I really want to detect is whether the returned value accurately reflects the value in the string. So if a double is returned that contains the value Long.MIN_VALUE + 1, that's fine if that's what was in the string. But how do I know if the value returned is what was really in the string? –  Garret Wilson Jun 29 '12 at 16:58
1  
@GarretWilson Take this into account: a long covers all the possible signed integers that can be accurately represented with 64 bits. When long overflows, it will already be many, many integers past the last point where consecutive double values still manage to cover consecutive integers (that is, are able to accurately represent those integers after rounding). –  Marko Topolnik Jun 29 '12 at 17:07
    
@MarkoTopolnik That is an interesting observation, but I'm not sure how it answers the question, "How can I know if the double value I get back from NumberFormat is exactly equivalent to the integral value represented in the original string?" I'm not talking solely about overflow; sorry about the confusion---I've edited the title. –  Garret Wilson Jun 29 '12 at 17:12
    
Exactly. Long.MIN_VALUE - 1 = "-9223372036854775809". There is no way to accurately represent that as either a Long or a Double. NumberFormat.parse() will return a Double, which lets you know that it isn't accurately representing the integral number. For Long.MIN_VALUE + 1, it will return a Long, letting you know that the number was OK as an integral value. –  Enwired Jun 29 '12 at 17:13
2  
I've checked, the mantissa is 52 bits long, so basically you can hit one in every 2^(64-52) integers near Long.MAX_VALUE. That's one in over four thousand. –  Marko Topolnik Jun 29 '12 at 17:28

For you question -

If NumberFormat gives me a parsed value that does not equal that stored in the input string, how do I detect that?

You can use

    if(number.toString().equals(string))
      //Parsed correctly
   else
     //Invalid parse
share|improve this answer
1  
good idea, but that is not locale-independent. number.toString() is locale-independent, but numberFormat.parse() is locale-sensitive, and he wants a procedure that will work in a locale-sensitive way. –  Enwired Jun 29 '12 at 16:54
    
I think this is not what OP is looking for. –  Mohammad Adil Jun 29 '12 at 17:15

This might not be the solution but worth notice.

public static void main(String[] args) {
        String string = "1111122222333334444455555";
        Locale locale = Locale.getDefault();
        NumberFormat numberFormat = NumberFormat.getIntegerInstance(locale);
        numberFormat.setParseIntegerOnly(true);
        Number number = numberFormat.parse(string);
        BigDecimal b = new BigDecimal(number.toString());
        System.out.println(b.toBigInteger());

    }

Output of this code is : 1111122222333334400000000

As you can see this is not equal to the number in the actual string , so their might be an overflow occoured.

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I fail to see how this code answers the question. Can create a method that inputs a String and returns a Number, and if the resulting number is not identical to the value in the original string, it throws an exception? I fail to see how the code you gave does that. –  Garret Wilson Jun 29 '12 at 19:20
    
What i am doing in that code is - converting 1.1111222223333344E24(parsed) this into a bigInteger so that we can compare it with original number that is in string form. –  Mohammad Adil Jun 29 '12 at 19:26
    
Yes, but you'll find that it won't work with locale-specific input representations such as "1,234" or "1.234". –  Garret Wilson Jun 29 '12 at 19:31
    
In reference to Enwired's answer he said "if it returns a Double, then it is not exactly equivalent to your integral value because a Double cannot accurately represent values at that magnitude" - i showed the same thing with an example... –  Mohammad Adil Jun 29 '12 at 19:40
    
No, you showed how one double value didn't equal an input integral value in string form---but we already knew that, because that was the question! Moreover, you also claimed that you could detect whether the output double value was exactly equal to the integral value in the input string, and your code does not do this! If you claim it does, rewrite the method to use the signature public Number parseNumber(String string, Locale locale) throws IllegalStateException where it throws the exception if the parsed number value would not equal the integral value in the string. –  Garret Wilson Jun 29 '12 at 20:37

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