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In Python:

def g(n):  
    if n <=3:        
        return n   
    return g(n-1) + 2 * g(n-2) + 3 * g(n-3)

I understand what this function is doing, but I can't seem to get how to make it iterative. Help, please. If possible, please include an explanation so that I could fully understand the problem.

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Homework? What is the maximum value of n? –  taskinoor Jun 29 '12 at 16:45
    
Well, you know how to calculate the first three, right? And how to calculate any subsequent number based on the preceding three? –  Qnan Jun 29 '12 at 16:45
    
maybe I'm a little confused because it's in plain text but you have two return statements right next to each other. Can you format this better? it's hard to understand –  Ryan Gray Jun 29 '12 at 16:45
    
There is no maximum. I just reformatted Ryan, sorry. –  King James Jun 29 '12 at 16:48
    
This is correct. An iterative function could easily be defined because this function uses summation. –  Ryan Gray Jun 29 '12 at 16:51

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted
def g(n):
    if n <= 3:
        return n
    a, b, c = 1, 2, 3
    for i in range(3, n):
        a, b, c = b, c, (a * 3 + b * 2 + c)
    return c
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This looks similar to the fibonacci series problem and is non-trivial to implement in an iterative fashion. It also looks like homework, so I will be posting the steps to get fibonacci iterative and you should be able to apply that to your problem.

In case you do not know, fibonacci is defined like this:

def fib(n):
    if n <= 1:  # technically, this is not 100% correct, but it's fine for n>=0
        return n
    return fib(n-1) + fib(n-2)

So let's analyze fib(n). First we see that there are two different cases: n <= 1 and not n <= 1. For n <= 1, fib(n) has no dependencies, so we can just evaluate that:

def fib_iter(n):
    if n <= 1:
        return n

Now we need to cover the other case. Let's first do a dependency analysis. What do we need for fib(n) with n > 1? We call to fib(n-1) and fib(n-2). In iterative language, these would be the two previous values. So obviously, we need to keep track of those. We will start with the two trivial cases on that one:

def fib_iter(n):
    if n <= 1:
        return n
    prev1, prev2 = 0, 1

I hope this is rather obvious. Then we resolve the functions in the order they are resolved in the recursive approach. When unwinding the recursion and analyzing the function, we find that the first non-trival value which will be evaluated is of course fib(2). Then fib(3) and so on until we reach n. Due to the recursive approach, several values are evaluated multiple times, but we do not need that in an iterative approach. The values are added together, which gives us the following code:

def fib_iter(n):
    if n <= 1:
        return n
    prev1, prev2 = 0, 1
    for i in xrange(2, n+1):
        curr = prev1 + prev2        # calculate fib(i)
        prev1, prev2 = prev2, curr  # shift previous value cache

The only thing which is missing is the return value, which is just curr at the time the loop ends. As we do xrange(2, n+1) and check for n <= 1 in advance, the loop will run at least once, so curr will be defined outside the loop.

def fib_iter(n):
    if n <= 1:
        return n
    prev1, prev2 = 0, 1
    for i in xrange(2, n+1):
        curr = prev1 + prev2
        prev1, prev2 = prev2, curr
    return curr

(this is my first homework answer; the SO community might give me feedback what I could've done better if I spoiled too much)

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Thanks for your help –  King James Jun 29 '12 at 17:10

Your recursive function can be read as

To find the value of g(30), find the value of g(29), g(28), and g(27)
  To find the value of g(29), find the value of g(28), g(27), and g(26)
    To find the value of g(28), find the value of g(27), g(26), and g(25)
      ...
        (repeat until all sub-finds have completed)

An iterative function would start at the other end,

I know the values of g(1), g(2), and g(3) -> calculate g(4)
I know the values of g(2), g(3), and g(4) -> calculate g(5)
I know the values of g(3), g(4), and g(5) -> calculate g(6)
...
(repeat until the desired g(n) is reached)
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This was too much fun not to solve ...

def g(n, *, _cache=[0, 1, 2, 3]):
    for _ in range(n - len(_cache) + 1):
        _cache.append(sum(i * _cache[-i] for i in (1, 2, 3)))
    return _cache[n]

Hopefully, you will have already found a solution.

share|improve this answer
    
which proves that there should be an obfuscated python contest. –  Jonas Wielicki Jun 30 '12 at 11:23
    
It may be obfuscated, but the function is also very efficient because of the cache usage. –  Noctis Skytower Jul 2 '12 at 14:13
    
It really wasn't any offense, I like it ;) –  Jonas Wielicki Jul 2 '12 at 14:13

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