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My company has created a web service that is used by an iPad app, and having no iOS development experience in house, we contracted out that work.

As part of an initialization process, the app receives a starting set of data from the web service, in JSON format. For most app users, this data set will be approximately 4 MB in size (uncompressed), and the app handles this without problems.

For a smaller group of users, the data size is much larger, approximately 65 MB uncompressed. With this data set, the iPad app crashes, and the developers have claimed that the app is being killed because it is using too much memory. If I understand them correctly, they are saying that this is happening while trying to parse the JSON into in-memory objects.

My feeling is that a device with 1 GB of memory should not have problems processing 65 MB of data, but I have no experience with the iOS environment to base this on.

Has anyone been able to process large sets of JSON data in iOS? If the problem is with loading the entire JSON data set in memory, is there a streaming JSON parser for iOS that would use less memory?

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Have you looked at RestKit. asynchronous data gets processed. Works in our company where we process huge amount of JSON from a web service. Also, a short term solution could be to send data in small packets of fixed size. Easier to handle and work with. –  S.P. Jun 29 '12 at 16:54
2  
At WWDC 2012 Apple said that there is a hard memory limit of 650MB available on the iPad 3 (which if you exceed watchdog will kill your app) but no other devices have a hard limit. But anyway, couldn't you just send the JSON data in 10MB chunks and have the app process them one-at-a-time? –  Robotic Cat Jun 29 '12 at 17:01
    
Best solution is to pass data in chunks, that will resolve the issue and make processing faster as well. –  rishi Jun 29 '12 at 17:21
    
@RoboticCat thank you for the info. If it were trivial to break up the JSON, I would just do it and move on. Unfortunately, this is not the case and I feel I have to push back because I cannot understand how the app can be running out of memory. –  adrift Jun 29 '12 at 22:23
    
@adrift I agree with the pushback. It depends, of course, on which device the developers are testing but if it is an iPad 3 I would be extremely dubious that 65MB of data is exceeding the 650MB limit. Can they either send you the code for review or at least send you an Allocations trace from Instruments to prove that there is more than 650MB of dirty memory allocated (and that Watchdog is killing the app should be provable by reviewing the error trace). –  Robotic Cat Jun 29 '12 at 23:10

1 Answer 1

I don't believe the issue is with converting json into NSDictionaries/ NSArrays / NSStrings / NSNumbers.

My guess would be that you are using the result of the json with autoreleased objects in a tight loop, such as creating thumbnails for all images before the autoreleased pool is emptied.

If they doesn't not fit what your data is doing, can you give us some example as to what type of work is being done on the data set?

This is very bad code because it will continue to stack umcompressed uiimages into the autorelease pool which won't be hit until all the images have been downloaded and made into thumbnails.

NSArray* images = [jsonObject objectForKey:@"images"];

for(NSString* imageURL in images){
    NSURL* url = [NSURL URLWithString: imageURL];
    NSData* data = [NSData dataWithContentsOfURL: url];
    UIImage* image = [UIImage imageWithData: data];
    // write image to disk
    UIImage* thumbnail = CreateThumbnailFromImage(image);
    // write thumbnail to disk
}

The same code can be fixed by adding in another autorelease pool that will clean up the autoreleased objects sooner.

for(NSString* imageURL in images){
    @autoreleasepool {
    NSURL* url = [NSURL URLWithString: imageURL];
    NSData* data = [NSData dataWithContentsOfURL: url];
    UIImage* image = [UIImage imageWithData: data];
    // write image to disk
    UIImage* thumbnail = CreateThumbnailFromImage(image);
    // write thumbnail to disk
    }
}
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The data in the JSON response is being stored in a database. I do not know the implementation details because this work is being performed by a contractor. The data in question is nothing complex - all string, date, or numeric values. Could you elaborate on what the autorelease pool is? I did ask whether it was possible memory was being allocated but not released, and was assured that this was not the problem. –  adrift Jun 29 '12 at 22:25
    
Added some clarity to my answer. –  Nico Jul 2 '12 at 14:13

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