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Let's say I have some model objects that resemble this:

public class FooModel
{
    [Required]
    public string Name { get; set; }
    [StringLength(100)]
    public string Description { get; set; }
    public bool HasBar { get; set; }
    public BarModel Bar { get; set; }
}

public class BarModel
{
    [Required]
    public string Name { get; set; }
    [StringLength(100)]
    public string Description { get; set; }
    public bool HasWidgets { get; set; }
    public IEnumerable<WidgetModel> Widgets { get; set; }
}

public class WidgetModel
{
    [Required]
    public string Name { get; set; }
    [StringLength(100)]
    public string Description { get; set; }
    public string Type { get; set; }
    public bool Active { get; set; }
}

I want to build a view for FooModel that, upon the HasBar input being checked, will load a partial view for Bar, complete with validation (unobtrusive). If Bar's HasWidgets is checked, it will load a partial view containing an interface for adding items of type WidgetModel to the form data.

When the form's submit button is clicked, I would like a complete graph passed to the controller.

I thought I could do something like this with Editor Templates, but my sub-objects are not being named in a way that would be parsed as part of the graph (I expect because they are being added after the fact and are not aware they are part of a bigger model).

Is there a mechanism/ pattern for supporting this sort of thing? I know it's a bit recursive but do I have to reinvent the wheel to get everything to be named properly?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If your UI allows this solution, I suggest you to load all the models into view at the first, but hide "Bar" (and so "Widget") section (hide using CSS). Then show them using JavaScript/jQuery.

Even if "Bar" needs to load data depending on "Foo" properties value (and "Widget" depending on "Bar"), it's always easier to load all elements at the very first step, and then fill them by Javascript or AJAX call.

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That's a legitimate method; I'd prefer to do it rather dynamically though. This is a small example of a situation I have where there are dozens of complex objects, each with thier own complex objects... I would like to only load what is necessary, if possible. –  Jeremy Holovacs Jun 29 '12 at 17:42
    
I'm still not sure if you're looking for: 1. something like Generic-EditorTemplate that supports any type of model; or 2. Just a way to load different view in a master view. See if this is your answer: stackoverflow.com/a/7364178/538387 if not, please provide a short sample that how would you like your view look likes. It could help me understand you. –  Tohid Jun 29 '12 at 23:33
    
I decided to go the simple way. –  Jeremy Holovacs Jul 2 '12 at 12:45
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Create the following:

  • An action that returns a BarModel
  • An action that returns a WidgetModel
  • An action that accepts an entire graph or whatever your master object is

Retrieve the individual components and when you're done submit to the master action.

public JsonResult GetBar(string name)
{
    var bar = //get bar
    return Json(bar);
}

public JsonResult GetWidget(string name)
{
    var widget = //get widget 
    return Json(widget);
}

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult SaveGraph(GraphModel graph)
{
    // save graph.Bar
    // save graph.Widget
    // save graph.Foo

    return ViewResult(graph);   // or redirect, JSON, etc.
}

On your client you and build and post the object regardless of what your original viewmodel was.

var graph = { Bar: { ... },
              Foo: { ... },
              Widget: { ... } 
            }

$.ajax({ url: '/mycontroller/savegraph',
         method: 'post',
         data: graph,
         success: function(resp) {
             // yay!
         }
      });
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It looks like that could work, but I decided it would be considerably less painful just to put it all on the form and hide the divs. Thanks! –  Jeremy Holovacs Jul 2 '12 at 12:46
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