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I have a simple (and possibly crude) way of moderating comments on a blog I am building. This is a learning/fun project, so I am rolling everything I can on my own to get more familiar with some different technologies. I am wondering if there are any holes in my logic, or perhaps a better implementation for what I am doing. I am going to allow anonymous comments on the site, but I want to moderate them for anything i find inappropriate. Here is how I have done it:

My Model is using EF Code first approach:

public class Comment
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public bool Moderated { get; set; }
    public string DisplayName { get; set; }
    public string Email { get; set; }
    public DateTime DateCreated { get; set; }
    public string Content { get; set; }
    public int PostId { get; set; }
    public Post Post { get; set; }
}

Standard stuff here. Then I created a ViewModel to display the details on a blog post and all the comments associated with it on a page like so:

public class PostCommentViewModel
{
    public Post Post { get; set; }
    public List<Comment> Comment { get; set; }

    public PostCommentViewModel(int postId)
    {
        var db = new BlogContext();

        Post = db.Posts.First(x => x.Id == postId);
        var query = from x in db.Comments where x.PostId == postId && x.Moderated == true select x;

        Comment = query.ToList();
    }
}

For the comments this just grabs the ones that are related to the PostId and that are Moderated (i.e. I have been able to review them)

For the View that is display this I just using a base scaffolding template:

public ActionResult Details(int id = 0)
    {
        var viewModel = new PostCommentViewModel(id);
        return View(viewModel);
    }

The cshtml:

@model CodeFirstBlog.ViewModels.PostCommentViewModel


<fieldset>
<legend>PostCommentViewModel</legend>
@Html.DisplayFor(x => x.Post.Title)
<br />
@Html.DisplayFor(x => x.Post.Content)
<br />
@Html.DisplayFor(x => x.Post.CreatedDate)
<hr />    
@foreach(var comment in Model.Comment)
{
    @Html.DisplayFor(x => comment.Content)
    <br />
    @Html.DisplayFor(x => comment.DateCreated)
    <br />
    @Html.DisplayFor(x => comment.DisplayName)
    <br />
    @Html.DisplayFor(x => comment.Email)
    <br />
    <hr />
}

</fieldset>
@Html.ActionLink("Add Comment", "AddComment", new { id = Model.Post.Id} )

Here is the AddComment in the Controller

public ActionResult AddComment(int id = 0)
    {
        return View();
    }

    [HttpPost]
    public ActionResult AddComment(Comment comment, int id)
    {
        if (ModelState.IsValid)
        {
            comment.PostId = id;
            db.Comments.Add(comment);
            db.SaveChanges();
            return RedirectToAction("Details", "Blog", new { id = id });
        }
        return RedirectToAction("Details", "Blog", new { id = id });
    }

So when I comment is added, Moderated is defaulting to false so the comment will not show up right away. Now if the admin logs in he can go to the ViewModeration view which just returns a list of all comments awaiting approval:

public ActionResult ViewModeration()
    {
        var comments = from x in db.Comments where x.Moderated == false select x;
        return View(comments);
    }

If he click the approve button it executes this in the controller:

 public ActionResult ApproveComment(int id)
    {
        Comment c = (from x in db.Comments
                     where x.Id == id
                     select x).First();
        c.Moderated = true;
        db.SaveChanges();
        return RedirectToAction("ViewModeration");
    }

What I really want to know is this:

  1. Are there any holes in this implementation, such as can a knowing user override the moderated value in the postback?
  2. Is there a simpler, or perhaps more elegant solution to follow? Again I don't want to use anything pre-built. The point of this project is to learn stuff.
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The model seems to hold off so far, so I'll answer the question this way:

Is there any holes in this implementation, such as can a knowing user override the moderated value in the postback?

Yes. I don't since any FORM code based on what you sent, but I'll assume you're creating a Comment via post value and directly saving to the database. This can be bad. You would be better getting only the values that you need from the user and fill the rest in the controller:

public ActionResult AddComment(Comment comment, int id)
{
    if (ModelState.IsValid)
    {
        // NEW
        comment.Moderated = false;

        comment.PostId = id;
        db.Comments.Add(comment);
        db.SaveChanges();
        return RedirectToAction("Details", "Blog", new { id = id });
    }
    return RedirectToAction("Details", "Blog", new { id = id });
}

Is there a simpler, or perhaps more elegant solution to follow? Again I don't want to use anything pre-built. The point of this project is to learn stuff.

As said earlier, this looks good so far. However, for reusability and testing purpose I would probably get the database operation in a different class, such as a Service or a Repository.

So, the code would look like this:

public ActionResult AddComment(Comment comment, int id)
{
    if (ModelState.IsValid)
    {
        CommentService.Save(comment);
        return RedirectToAction("Details", "Blog", new { id = id });
    }
    return RedirectToAction("Details", "Blog", new { id = id });
}

This ain't a big change, but it's huge in the sens of it's going to get you more flexibility later if you want to reuse this code.

As for your PostCommentViewModel class, I woundn't do ANY operation in ViewModels, especialy not in the constructor. The way you should use ViewModels would be to bind data onto it instead of having the ViewModel doing the job. You could be getting the data from anyway, ViewModels represent only a structure of what need to be displayed. So, get the code out of there, and put it in a service (i.e: CommentService).

share|improve this answer
    
Very thorough, thanks. Do you have any good reference for creating Services? I haven't really see them too much (or just wasn't paying attention), but I like the idea. Is a service something that I would you for all database operation only? Do they just accomplish cleaning up controller code, or is there more to them? –  davidisawesome Jun 29 '12 at 17:31
    
It could pretty much just a class that do one and only one job: get the data. So, in this case the database operations would be in the service. You can go even deeper with decoupling your logic from your data, but you should start slow as it can become harder to maintain. Having a way to access your data without any context is really useful for any kind of application. –  Allov Jun 29 '12 at 18:15

The answer to your first question is yes, a knowing user can set the Moderated value. A similar thing happened to GitHub not so long ago. See this post for a full explanation. The short explanation is that the user can modify your form data in something like Chrome Developer Tools and set the Moderated property on the model before posting.

To answer your second question, I can see two options (others please comment if you know of more)

1) Instead of letting the DefaultModelBinder bind the values to your Comment model, you could call TryUpdateModel and only specify the properties that should be updated. E.g.

public ActionResult AddComment(int id)
{
    if (ModelState.IsValid)
    {
        Comment comment = new Comment();
        TryUpdateModel(comment, new[] { "Email ", "DateCreated", "Content", "etc" });
        comment.PostId = id;
        db.Comments.Add(comment);
        ...
    }
    ...
}

2) A better option, imho, is to create a separate model class that does not even contain the Moderated property and use this model for user comments. You could use your existing Comment model for admin purposes on Actions that are only accessible to admins.

share|improve this answer
    
What if in this ActionResult I manually set comment.Moderated = false; That should override whatever was sent back in the form, correct? –  davidisawesome Jun 29 '12 at 17:33
    
Indeed it would. I'm not sure why, but something about that doesn't feel quite right. I'm sure it will work, but I don't think that is a common way of handling a situation like this. I guess I don't feel right about it because you are allowing a Comment to be in a dangerous state. I don't think your comment should ever be in a dangerous state if it's avoidable. What does the rest of the community think about this? –  Kevin Aenmey Jun 29 '12 at 17:38
    
I agree with Kevin. Working with ViewModels and DTOs can secure your logic from what you have to really display. Get the only stuff you need to the user. Less he can see and use, the better for you. –  Allov Jun 29 '12 at 18:16

You can integrate CanModerate solution instead. Integration is relatively simple.

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