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I have a generic method, for example:

public static<T> T execute(...) {
    ...
}

How can I define what type T is in the method body? For example:

if (T == String) {
  // do something with strings
  // return string;
}
if (T == Bitmap) {
  // do something with bitmap
  // return bitmap;
}

I tried the following, but it didn't work:

T par = null;
if(par instanceof String) {
    // do something with strings
    // return string;
}

I tried declaring par like below, but that didn't work either.

T par = (T) null;
T par = (T) new Object();
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10  
If you need to do this, it sounds like you don't want generics. –  Oliver Charlesworth Jun 29 '12 at 17:17
    
stackoverflow.com/questions/5734720/… Take a look at this –  Daniel Leschkowski Jun 29 '12 at 17:17
3  
Perhaps you're looking to overload a function instead of generics? Have one method execute(String s) and another execute(BitMap b)? –  Thomas Jun 29 '12 at 17:19
    
No input parameters are the same, it is important to different return values. –  bvitaliyg Jun 29 '12 at 17:23
1  
"How can I define what type T is" You don't define what T is. On the contrary, the caller chooses what T is, and your method must be able to work with any choice of T –  newacct Jun 30 '12 at 0:20

4 Answers 4

You could probably do something like this:

public static <T>  T execute(Class<T> t) {
    if(String.class == t) {

    }
}
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If your code only supports a discrete set of data types, you don't want to use generics. As mentioned in the comments on the original post, this situation calls for overloaded method calls.

Consider, for example, a situation where you support Strings, Integers, and Doubles, but you don't have specific logic for other data types. You would define your methods such as:

public static String execute(String s) { ... }
public static Integer execute(Integer i) { ... }
public static Double execute(Double d) { ... }
public static Object execute(Object o) { ... }

The first three methods would define the logic for the three discrete data types you do support, while the final would define logic and/or error handling for any other data types you do not support. (Of course, this doesn't cover primitives not of int or double type, but this is just an example.)

Generics were initially added to Java to support a Collection knowing exactly what it contained. It was a way of guaranteeing that a List held only Strings by declaring it a List<String>, for example. This capability was then extended, but the basic concept held -- guarantee that if you put an unknown object of type X in, even if you don't know what X is at compile time, you can write logic for getting that same type X out. (This article is an interesting read, if out-dated.)

This does not mean it should be used where the logic applied in a method or class is dependent on the data type of the input. It should be used where it doesn't matter the incoming data type, and the same logic will be applied consistently across the unknown data type X. So if you have different logic for String than Doubles, you should not be using generics.

tl;dr: Since the original post indicated different logic based on the data type of the input parameter, therefore, generics are not appropriate to be used. Overloading the execute method based on the supported data types should be used instead.

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I understand, but if i need so: codepublic static String execute(String s) { ... } public static Integer execute(String s) { ... } public static Double execute(String s) { ... } public static Object execute(String s) { ... } code All depends on what the string is. If string is image URL, I want get Bitmap or Drawable. If string is URL of XML or JSON, I want get it. –  bvitaliyg Jun 29 '12 at 18:04
    
What is forcing you to use generics? Is this homework? –  Roddy of the Frozen Peas Jun 29 '12 at 18:06

T Here is known as Type Parameters.

// here will define the type of T in the method go()

public interface Comparable<T> { 


        public int compareTo(T t) {

           // do something...

         }
      }

For eg:

I am having a class Song, and i want to sort the songs on the basis of its title.

public class Song implements Comparable<Song> {

  private String title;

  public void compareTo(Song s) {

       title.compareTo(s.title());

    }

  public void setTitle(String s) {

    this.title = s;

   }

  public void getTitle() {

    return this.title;
   }

  public String toString() {

    return getTitle();

   }

 }
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If you're splitting the functionality in code that way already, and the inputs are the same, you'd probably be well served with different functions. So instead of(using Jeshurun's answer)

public static <T>  T execute(Class<T> t) 
{
  if(String.class == t) {

  }
}

BitMap b = execute(BitMap.class);

You would have

public BitMap bitmapExecute(...)
{
  commonWork();
  //do bitmap stuff
}

public String stringExecute(...)
{
  commonWork();
  //do String stuff
}

BitMap b = bitmapExecute(...);
String s = stringExecute(...);

If there's a large block of common code, with only a small section different based on type, you can move that common code to its own function.

public someObject commonWork(...)
{
  //Do common stuff
}

As long as you are making the decision about the type at compile time, you shouldn't have to have instanceof blocks.

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