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Which I'm trying to accomplish is have two classes, a non generic and a generic.

I need a non generic class because I plan to insert objects of this class and insert them in a List<T>

Here's the code

// Non-generic
public class Response
{
    public object Value { get; }
}

// Generic
public class Response<T> : Response
{
    public T Value { get; set; }
}

I'd like to have a List<Response>, where when I access to this object I get the Value property as object.

But when I receive this object as generic, access to the T Value property and hide the object Value property.

I hope be clear, if not.. please let me know.

EDIT: This is for a quiz. So, each question has answers.. For example in MultipleChoiceQuestion, it could have several answers A, B, C, D as view shapes, or could be strings, or integers.

public abstract class Question
{
    public Question(string questionText)
    {
        this.QuestionText = questionText;
    }

    public string QuestionText { get; set; }
}

// Non-generic
public class Response
{
    public object Value { get; }
}

// Generic
public class Response<T> : Response
{
    public T Value { get; set; }
}

public class MathProblemQuestion : Question
{
    public Response Response { get; set; }
}

public class MultipleChoiseQuestion : Question
{
    public Response Response { get; set; }

    public IEnumerable<Response> PossibleResponses;

    ...
}

public class TrueOrFalse : Question
{
    ...
}
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you can try the new keyword but i'm not sure if it will work in this scenario. public new T Value { get; set; } –  Dusty Lau Jun 29 '12 at 17:49
3  
3 times read and I don't get what you want, can you post an example of pseudo code of what you are trying to archieve? –  Mr. Jun 29 '12 at 17:49
    
I've edited my question.. sorry for that, English is not my native language (by the way, I'm also from Mexico, Tamaulipas) –  Darf Zon Jun 29 '12 at 18:38
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6 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

I would personally just give them different names. It will make your life much simpler, and the code much clearer:

public abstract class Response
{
    public abstract object ObjectValue { get; }
}

public class Response<T> : Response
{
    public T Value { get; set; }

    public override object ObjectValue { get { return Value; } }
}

Note that I've made the Response class abstract - it's hard to see how it could work elegantly otherwise; if Response has its own storage for Value then presumably that could be set to a non-T value. Hopefully making this abstract won't be a problem for you.

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Perhaps you understood the primary goal better than I do. Is there something I missed in my response? –  Ed S. Jun 29 '12 at 17:57
    
He may actually need to use the non-generic version (e.g. Action vs Action<T>). And I think his goal would be to have a List<Response> where the compiler knows what actual derived type each instance is. (That's what I based my answer on...) –  Michael Edenfield Jun 29 '12 at 18:02
2  
Depending on your project design, if you only use the non-generic base class Response internally, you might even make ObjectValue internal so consumers of your API don't know/don't care about the fact that you have an object upcaster and it won't be exposed in the intellisense (satisfying your desire to "hide" the property). –  Chris Sinclair Jun 29 '12 at 18:03
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I need a non generic class because I plan to insert objects of this class and insert them in a List<T>

Not sure I understand that. A List<T> can certainly hold generic types.

var ls = new List<List<int>>;  // works!

If you fall back to using object everywhere then what's the point of using generics? You no longer have a strongly typed collection for all intents and purposes because the underlying data, the data you really care about, is of the type object.

But when I receive this object as generic, access to the T Value property and hide the object Value property.

If you use Response<object> then T is object for all instances of your type.

Perhaps I am missing something here. If I am could you elaborate for me? I see no reason why your generic type wouldn't work.

EDIT: I think I understand now. You want a single List<T> to hold Response objects which have different generic arguments. If it is possible I suggest limiting each generic type to implement a specific interface, i.e.,

public interface IResponseData
{
    // whatever
}

public class Response<T> where T : IResponseData
{
    public T Value { get; set; }
}

Now, if you need to allow ints and other types which share no common ancestry then this won't work and Jon Skeet has a better solution for you.

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In order to do what you want, you need to tie the two values together:

public abstract class Response
{
    public object Value { get; set; }
}

public class Response<T> : Response
{
    private T _value;
    public new T Value
    {
        get { return _value; }
        set { base.Value = _value = value; }
    }
}

However, as others pointed out--your premise is incorrect: you can use generic types as type parameters in other generic types:

List<Response<YourObject>> 

would be perfectly valid.

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If you do the below (using the "new" keyword) you will hide the property on the base class:

// Non-generic
public class Foo
{
    public object Value { get; set; }
}

// Generic
public class Foo<T> : Foo
{
    public new T Value { get; set; }
}

Unless you add another property with a different name I don't see a way around that. I'm not completely understanding why you need to have to different versions of the class in order to use a list you can have a List< Foo < T > > just fine.

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If I understand your question correctly, you can do what you want, as long as you're willing to manually typecast your list elements when you read them back.

The first part of your question is, how do you "hide" an inherited property with a new one of a different type, and you've already achieved that. You don't need any special keywords to replace properties. Given your sample types:

public class Response
{
    public object Value
    {
        get;
        set;
    }
}

public class Response<T> : Response
{
    public T Value
    {
        get;
        set;
    }

}

You can already do the following:

// typeof(response.Value) == System.Object
var response = new Response();

// typeof(responseint.Value) == System.Int32
var responseint = new Response<int>();

However, what you are further asking to do, put them into a List<Response> and still treat them as their derived type, will not work without an explicit typecast. The element type of a List<> is fixed at compile time, and as far as the compiler knows, all elements of the list have that type. You can add more derived types to the list, if you want, but once they are in there, when you get then back out the compiler only knows that they are of the base type.

At run time, of course, the actual type metadata is present, so the run-time knows how to turn a Response into a Response<int> as long as that's what it really is. To demonstrate in code, given the above instances of Response and Response<int>:

 // this part is fine, but...
var responses = new List<Response>();
responses.Add(response);
responses.Add(responseint); 

// This will not work.
responses[1].Value += 1; 

// But this will.
(responses[1] as Response<int>).Value += 1;
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I presume that you are looking to insert Responses of different types in the same list and make the object version of Response not settable. However the code below doesn't work because the automatically generated backing stores for the properties aren't tied together:

// Non-generic
public class Response
{
    public object Value { get; private set; }
}
// Generic
public class Response<T> : Response
{
    public new T Value { get; set; }
}

public static void Main()
{
    List<Response> List = new List<Response>() { new Response<int>() { Value = 1 }, new Response<string>() { Value = "p" } };

    // Throws NullReferenceException
    Console.WriteLine(list[0].Value);
    Console.WriteLine(list[1].Value);
}

Try this, which uses a protected field to back the properties:

// Non-generic
public class Response
{
    protected object valueObject;

    public object Value
    {
        get
        {
            return valueObject;
        }
    }
}
// Generic
public class Response<T> : Response
{
    public new T Value
    {
        get
        {
            return (T)valueObject;
        }
        set
        {
            valueObject = value;
        }
    }
}

public static void RunSnippet()
{
    List<Response> list = new List<Response>() { new Response<int>() { Value = 1 }, new Response<string>() { Value = "p" } };

    Console.WriteLine(list[0].Value);
    Console.WriteLine(list[1].Value);
}
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