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I saw a similar piece of perl code in the code base and wanted to know if this (setting i=100) was an OK way to get out of the for loop? Are there any pitfalls to this?

int a[100];

...

bool check_if_array_contains_29()
{
    bool result = false;
    for(int i=0; i<100; ++i)
    {
        if(a[i] == 29)
        {
            result = true;
            i = 101;
        }
    }
    return result;
}

This is more like what I would do.

bool check_if_array_contains_29()
{
    bool result = false;
    for(int i=0; i<100 && !result; ++i)
    {
        if(a[i] == 29)
        {
            result = true;
        }
    }
    return result;
}

Edit -1:

I am not looking for a oneliner in perl to achieve the functionality. The real code (functionality) was much more complex. This is just an example that I simplified to explain my point(early termination of for loop).

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4  
Shouldn't you put && !result in the loop condition? –  TheZ Jun 29 '12 at 18:27
    
The only difference between C and Perl is Perl uses last instead of break. –  ikegami Jun 29 '12 at 18:45
    
Yes, that is right. I'll fix that. –  Kingkong Jnr Jun 29 '12 at 18:46
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6 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Why wouldn't you just do this:

bool check_if_array_contains_29()
{
    for(int i=0; i < 100; ++i)
    {
         if (a[i] == 29)
           return true;
    }
    return false;
}

Edit:
I know some people feel that multiple return statements are just horrible and should be avoided at all costs, but to me, having multiple returns in a method like the one presented makes the code easier to read and follow.

Edit 2:
Additional versions so that if the method needs to have some side effects or perform some additional operations you can use a break statement, or you can adjust the for loop conditional, or you could add some labels and some gotos.

bool check_if_array_contains_29_take2()
{
    bool result = false;
    for (int i=0; i < 100; ++i)
    {
        if (a[i] == 29)
        {
            result = true;
            break;
        }
    }

    // Do Other Stuff
    return result;
}

bool check_if_array_contains_29_take3()
{
    bool result = false;
    for (int i=0; !result && i < 100; ++i)
    {
        result = a[i] == 29;
    }

    // Do Other Stuff
    return result;
}

// Special edition for those who can't get enough goto
bool check_if_array_contains_29_and_do_more_stuff_without_early_return()
{
    bool result = false;
    for (int i=0; i < 100; ++i)
    {
        if (a[i] == 29)
        {
            result = true;
            break;
        }
    }

    if (!result)
        goto error;

    // Do some other stuff in the code here
    goto done;

done:
    return result;
error:
    result = false;
    goto done;
}
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Agreed, this looks fantastic. –  TheZ Jun 29 '12 at 18:33
2  
The LLVM project's coding standards specifically recommend early returns because in long functions, it makes it clear at that point that no more processing will occur, rather than forcing the reader to continue scanning to see if any will occur. They have a really good write-up on why early returns are actually a cleaner methodology. I know this question was posted for the "C" language, but in C++, early-return resource deallocation pitfalls are covered by using auto_ptr or similar. –  phonetagger Jun 29 '12 at 18:36
1  
It's horrible, break and last statements are far cleaner, aside from the fact that it works in the example, but not if you want to do something else with that value. –  Rafael Jun 29 '12 at 18:38
1  
...but in the general case, where perhaps the function isn't finished at that point, break should probably be preferred. As Matt Ball mentions, it clearly indicates intent, and doesn't result in execution of unnecessary condition tests. –  phonetagger Jun 29 '12 at 18:39
    
@Rafael - Your statement is a matter of opinion & preference. As I mentioned, the LLVM project, which probably spanks your butt, has a really good write-up in their coding standards about why early returns should be preferred. –  phonetagger Jun 29 '12 at 18:41
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What's wrong with break or simply return true inside the loop? It clearly conveys intent, and doesn't rely on the loop condition.

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4  
And I won't even start talking about this strange comparison of C and Perl. ) In Perl this task is quite easily solved by one-liner (like scalar grep { $_ == 29 } @arr), why use some strange exit points at all? ) –  raina77ow Jun 29 '12 at 18:31
    
scalar grep { $_ == 29 } @arr, at least in principle, scans the entire array (I don't know whether the Perl interpreter will optimize it). –  Keith Thompson Jun 29 '12 at 18:40
    
thanks.. but the real functionality of the code I saw was more complex.. I just simplified it to illustrate the point (early return).. –  Kingkong Jnr Jun 29 '12 at 18:52
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In Perl, you would use last, possibly with a label, to exit a loop early.

To find the first occurrence of 29 in array @x, you would use List::MoreUtils::first_index:

 my $i = first_index { $_ == 29 } @x;
 $i > -1 or die "Cannot find 29 in array\n";

I cannot think of any technical pitfalls to the silly assignment to the loop variable, but it is a total WTF, and confusing the people reading code is a pretty significant pitfall.

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The right way to do it is with the break instruction in C or last in Perl

int a[100];

...

bool check_if_array_contains_29()
{
    bool result = false;
    for(int i=0; i<100; ++i)
    {
        if(a[i] == 29)
        {
            result = true;
            break;
        }
    }
    return result;
}

Although the first way is pretty acceptable. Regarding the second one, is valid but i wouldn't use it as there are simplier ways to do it.

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In C you would use break, it exits the smallest loop (the loop where the instruction is in):

for(...) {
    if (a[i] == 29) {
        result = true;
        break;
    }
}

But in your case you can simply exit the whole function:

for(...) {
    if (a[i] == 29)
        return true;
}
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Use break:

    bool check_if_array_contains_29()
    {
       bool result = false;
       for(int i=0; i<100; ++i)
       {   
          if(a[i] == 29)
          {
            result = true;
            break;
          }
        }
     return result;
    }
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