Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

Simplified version of what I'm trying to achieve:

  • I have a WinForms app that runs hidden (Visible = false) in the background.
  • It's got only one Form, and I kept the default name - Form1
  • This WinForms app hosts a WCF Service. For now we'll call it the Listener service.
  • This Listener service has a function called "DisplayAlert()" that's exposed as a service function
  • An app sits on another machine sends a message to the Listener Service via a standard WCF service call

I've got all of the above working just fine. I can step through the code and watch the flow of messages as the DisplayAlert() function is called.

What I can't figure out, and I can't believe it's so hard to find how to do something this simple:

- I'd like the DisplayAlert() function in the hosted service interact directly with the WinForm that's hosting it to make the form visible.

All I want to do is set the Visibility to true, and call another function on the WinForm.

This seems to me like it should be as simple as adding a reference to the form, or making a public function on the form and calling it from the service class, but I can't even figure out how to reference Form1 from within the service class.

Am I missing something obvious? How do I even reference the instance of Form1, which is hosting the service?

I've gone down the path of....

  • Creating an event in the ListenerService (AlertReceived, virtual void OnAlertReceived), thinking that on the Form, I could add an event handler.
    • No dice. I'm not instantiating a ListenerService class directly, it's running in the ServiceHost.
  • Trying to reference the Application object from within the class, thinking I could reference it as Application.Form1, but nope. I can't even see the Application object from within the service class.
    • I'm probably missing something obvious here, but I'm not sure.

Any other suggestions?

I can add code if it helps.

share|improve this question
    
If there's not a way to do it directly, I'll take that as an answer and rethink the design. – David Jun 29 '12 at 18:45
up vote 9 down vote accepted

Using this method you have completely a thread-safe application, and you don't have any limitation.

Service Contract Definition

[ServiceContract]
public interface IService
{
    [OperationContract]
    void DisplayAlert();
}

Service Implementation

public class Service:IService
{
    public void DisplayAlert()
    {
        var form = Form1.CurrentInstance;
        form.MySynchronizationContext.Send(_ => form.Show(), null);
    }
}

Program.cs

[STAThread]
static void Main()
{        
    var host = new ServiceHost(typeof (Service));
    host.Open();

    Application.SetCompatibleTextRenderingDefault(false);
    Application.EnableVisualStyles();
    Application.Run(new Form1());
 }

Form Implementation

public partial class Form1 : Form
{
    public static Form1 CurrentInstance;
    public SynchronizationContext MySynchronizationContext;
    private bool showForm = false;

    public Form1()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
        MySynchronizationContext = SynchronizationContext.Current;
        CurrentInstance = this;
    }

    // use this method for hiding and showing if you want this form invisible on start-up
    protected override void SetVisibleCore(bool value)
    {
        base.SetVisibleCore(showForm ? value : showForm);
    }

    public void Show()
    {
        showForm = true;
        Visible = true;   
    }

    public void Hide()
    {
        showForm = true;
        Visible = true;
    }
}

Client

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Press Enter to show form");
        Console.ReadLine();

        var client = new ServiceClient();
        client.DisplayAlert();
    }
}
share|improve this answer

In my opinion the answer is "simpol" as a friend says. First of all I would not even bother to follow the path described by you, after all a web service provides all the necessary means to communicate with it. Between your Form1 (which host your service) and your hosted service add a client (where client code is hosted by same Form1) and allow your client to communicate with your service using a duplex channel. In this way your client will know if a message was sent to your service by initiating a a long running request and being notified through the callback. Here is a link with a fancy article related to duplex channels: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/carlosfigueira/archive/2012/01/11/wcf-extensibility-transport-channels-duplex-channels.aspx

P.S: This is a rough suggestion to get you started which for sure can be improved.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! We wanted to avoid a lot of open channels, and polling for this one. Bandwidth is tied up with a billion other functions in our retail locations, so at store level, we really need something that just sits and listens until there's a reason to send an alert. In another situation, I'd use your suggestion, so +1. – David Jun 29 '12 at 19:39

Can you use a singleton for your service? If so you could implement it like this:

[ServiceContract]
[ServiceBehavior(InstanceContextMode=InstanceContextMode.Single)]
public class MyClass : IMyClass
{
    Form1 _f;
    public MyClass(Form1 f)
    {
        _f = f;
    }

    [OperationContract]
    public void Alert(string mess)
    {
        _f.Text = mess;
    }
}

Then when you setup your service host, you instantiate it and pass it the form:

MyClass c = new MyClass(this);
string baseAddress = "http://localhost:12345/Serv";
var host = new ServiceHost(c, new Uri(baseAddress));
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.