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cat file1.txt
Id    leng  sal   mon
25671 34343 56565 5565
44888 56565 45554 6868
23343 23423 26226 6224
77765 88688 87464 6848
66776 23343 63463 4534

cat file2.txt
Id     sp He Ho
25671  33 45 35
34353  64 75 33
77765  56 56 67

cat output.txt
Id     leng   sal  sp He Ho
25671  34343 56565 33 45 35
77765 88688  87464 56 56 67

Compare both file1.txt & file2.txt, if the column1 is same in both files(file1.txt & file2.txt), report in separte output(output.txt) only matched one by merging (ignore 4th column in file1.txt, while merging output file).

I have tried cat file1.txt file2.txt|sort-u >output.txt. But it does not work. Any awk,trick using join is appreciated.

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1  
What have you tried with awk or perl? This sounds like homework –  DVK Jun 29 '12 at 19:23

3 Answers 3

awk 'NR==FNR{ s[$1] = $2 " " $3 }
     NR!=FNR{ if( $1 in s ) print $1, s[$1], $2,$3,$4}' file1.txt file2.txt
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thanks Pursell. It works well. –  user1440683 Jun 29 '12 at 19:40
join -o 0 1.2 1.3 2.2 2.3 2.4 <(sort file1.txt) <(sort file2.txt) |sort -n | tr ' ' '\t'
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This might work for you (GNU sed):

cat <<\! >file1.txt
> Id    leng  sal   mon
> 25671 34343 56565 5565
> 44888 56565 45554 6868
> 23343 23423 26226 6224
> 77765 88688 87464 6848
> 66776 23343 63463 4534
> !
cat <<\! >file2.txt
> Id     sp He Ho
> 25671  33 45 35
> 34353  64 75 33
> 77765  56 56 67
> !
sed 's|^\(\S*\)\s*\(.*\)|/^\1/s/\\(\\(\\S*\\s*\\)\\{3\\}\\).*/\\1\2/p|' file2.txt
/^Id/s/\(\(\S*\s*\)\{3\}\).*/\1sp He Ho/p
/^25671/s/\(\(\S*\s*\)\{3\}\).*/\133 45 35/p
/^34353/s/\(\(\S*\s*\)\{3\}\).*/\164 75 33/p
/^77765/s/\(\(\S*\s*\)\{3\}\).*/\156 56 67/p
sed 's|^\(\S*\)\s*\(.*\)|/^\1/s/\\(\\(\\S*\\s*\\)\\{3\\}\\).*/\\1\2/p|' file2.txt |
sed -nf - file1.txt
Id    leng  sal   sp He Ho
25671 34343 56565 33 45 35
77765 88688 87464 56 56 67

Explanation:

Convert file2.txt into a sed script that transforms file1.txt into the required format.

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Ack! Is that a ! as the heredoc string? That's a bit shocking to the eyes at first. I might start using cat <<\!@#$. That should cause no confusion! (except that it's not actually quoted, and is interpolated) –  William Pursell Jun 30 '12 at 17:50
    
Using \! as the heredoc marker is definitely confusing. In interactive bash, zsh and probably many other shells, that is an interpolating heredoc. In dash (and probably others) it is a quoted heredoc. This is likely to cause some errors. –  William Pursell Jun 30 '12 at 18:01
    
@WilliamPursell I always quote my bash here-document delimiter so as not to fall foul of unwanted interpolation. As to other shells, I cannot comment with confidence. –  potong Jun 30 '12 at 21:34

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