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I was told that my singleton template may not truly be a singleton, in that there is ways to create more than one object with it. When I asked how to fix it, I was ignored. That is why I come here to ask is my singleton template class truly a singleton?

#ifndef SINGLETON_H_
#define SINGLETON_H_

template <class T>
class Singleton
{
private:
static T* instance;

protected:
    Singleton<T>(  )
    {
    }

public:
    static T* getInstancePtr(  )
    {
        if ( instance == 0 )
            instance = new T(  );

        return instance;
    }
};

template <class T> T* Singleton<T>::instance = 0;

#endif

This is then inherited by a class which I wish to be a singleton like so:-

class Console : public Singleton< Console >
{
};
share|improve this question
8  
Have you tried compiling Console c1, c2; ? – Charles Bailey Jun 29 '12 at 19:22
    
I have just found one way to circumvent the single instance. If I initialise console with Console c1; I have an instance of Console for c1 and a 2nd instance of Console in the instance pointer in the Singleton class. – ctor Jun 29 '12 at 19:54
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Use a local static variable to implement the singleton pattern:

template <class T>
class Singleton
{
    static T* getInstancePtr(  )
    {
        static T instance; // <-- HERE

        return &instance;
    }
};

Apart from much less code, it is also guaranteed thread-safe. It will be constructed on the first call to Singleton<X>::getInstancePtr() and successive calls will get the one instance.

Alternatively if you want one instance per thread you can use thread_local instead:

template <class T>
class Singleton
{
    static T* getInstancePtr(  )
    {
        thread_local T instance; // <-- HERE

        return &instance;
    }
};
share|improve this answer

You've made the default constructor protected. The derived class can access it, so this will compile:

Console c1, c2;
share|improve this answer
2  
Please do not re-post other people comments as answers. – Nikolai N Fetissov Jun 29 '12 at 19:29
2  
@Nikolai - why's that? – Scott Langham Jun 29 '12 at 19:30
1  
Because it's rude. – Nikolai N Fetissov Jun 29 '12 at 19:32
2  
@Nikolai : And sometimes it's also the only way to get a correct answer posted, so the question doesn't remain open forever. If Charles wanted to post an answer, I'm sure he would have. – ildjarn Jun 29 '12 at 19:41
3  
@NikolaiNFetissov: I don't see how it's rude. I posted a comment to prompt the asker into ensuring that his example was complete. Besides, my comment was a question; this is a true answer. – Charles Bailey Jun 29 '12 at 19:59

One simple reason why you can't guarantee it's a singleton is due to thread-safety.

If two or more threads call getInstancePtr at the same time you may end up with two or more instances depending on thread swapping.

share|improve this answer
    
The OP's question has nothing to do with multithreading, and Singletons are not unique to multithreading either. – phonetagger Jun 29 '12 at 19:43

I used the same singleton template as you do but leave it to the user to create private constructors and destructors. the user will have to befriend the singleton class but it is close to what I want and it can be used as a singleton. It isn't threadsafe (yet), but it 'solves' the multiple instance problem.

share|improve this answer

To work in a multithreaded environment, you need a different solution. You must use specific language capabilities to ensure that only one instance of the object is created in the presence of multiple threads. One of the more common solutions is to use the Double-Check Locking idiom to keep separate threads from creating new instances of the singleton at the same time.

share|improve this answer
    
The OP's question has nothing to do with multithreading, and Singletons are not unique to multithreading either. – phonetagger Jun 29 '12 at 19:42

Ok so other than any problems with multi-threading there was a case where I could create two instances. By initialising the class Console below

class Console : public Singleton< Console >
{
};

like so

Console c1;

I was ending up with two instances of Console, one in the instance pointer held within the Singleton class and one within the c1 object itself. I solved this by changing the Singleton class to the following.

#ifndef SINGLETON_H_
#define SINGLETON_H_

template <class T>
class Singleton
{
private:
    static T* instance;

protected:
    Singleton<T>(  )
    {
        if ( instance == 0 )
            instance = static_cast<T*>(this);
    }

public:
    static T* getInstancePtr(  )
    {
        return instance;
    }
};

template <class T> T* Singleton<T>::instance = 0;

#endif

However other than multi-threading issues I am now more certain that my Singleton class will be less likely to result in multiple instances.

share|improve this answer
    
That doesn't solve it. instance will point to the first instance constructed, but you can still default construct as many instances of derived class as you want (unless you make derived class' constructors also private). ideone.com/Y0zPo – jrok Jun 29 '12 at 20:41
1  
I've fixed it and added Singleton as a friend to the classes that inherit it. Thanks :) – ctor Jun 29 '12 at 20:59

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