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The TimeSpan class can be constructed with days, hours, minutes, seconds and milliseconds:

public TimeSpan(int hours, int minutes, int seconds);
public TimeSpan(int days, int hours, int minutes, int seconds);
public TimeSpan(int days, int hours, int minutes, int seconds, int milliseconds);

It can also be constructed with "ticks" which are 100 nanosecond units of time:

public TimeSpan(long ticks);

What is the significance of 100 nanoseconds when a lot of other time-related objects (eg. System.Timers.Timer.Interval) are based on millisecond units? Also, why not use microseconds, which are 10x longer, but a much more common unit of time?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Because Wintel computers are based on a hardware clock that uses 100ns ticks.

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It is a clunk, a unit of time used in [Open]VMS.

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Looks like it's been around for awhile. –  Robert Harvey Jun 29 '12 at 22:51
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