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I'm developing a multi-player game using Node.js as a server. At the moment it is simply a 2D triangle the player can drive around the screen. The game loop runs on the server and sends updates of the game world state to the client. The client has a draw loop running which draws the triangle onto the canvas using the updated position and orientation.

The PROBLEM:

I have used setInterval with an interval of 30ms for the draw loop. However, the movement of the game can become fairly jittery. I've tried measuring the time it takes from the start of one loop to the next as shown in the code below. The results show that between loops take anywhere between 1ms to 200ms.

Example console output:

looptime: 59
looptime: 14
looptime: 22
looptime: 148
looptime: 27

The only other things I've got running client side are onkeyup/onkeydown listeners and socket.io listeners to send data to the server. Any help is much appreciated.

Code:

...

function init(){
    var canvas = document.getElementById('canvas');
    if(canvas.getContext){
        setInterval(draw, 30);
    }
}

function draw(){

    timeNow = new Date().getTime();
    console.log('looptime: '+(timeNow-startDrawTime));
    startDrawTime = new Date().getTime();
    var ctx = document.getElementById('canvas').getContext('2d');
    triX = tri.pos.x;
    triY = tri.pos.y;

    ctx.save();
    ctx.clearRect(0,0,400,400);// clear canvas

    ctx.save();
    ctx.translate(triX, triY);
    ctx.rotate(tri.orientation);

    ctx.save();
    ctx.beginPath();
    ctx.arc(0,0,5,0,Math.PI*2, true);
    ctx.stroke();
    ctx.restore();

    //draw tri

    ctx.save();
    ctx.beginPath();
    ctx.moveTo(0, 0);
    ctx.moveTo(0, -5);
    ctx.lineTo(5, 5);
    ctx.lineTo(-5, 5);
    ctx.closePath();
    ctx.fill();
    ctx.restore();

    ctx.restore();

    ctx.restore();
    //console.log('looptime: '+((new Date().getTime())-time));
}
share|improve this question
    
Think that much save and restore calls is really bad for performance, actually is that really needed in your code? –  Delta Jun 30 '12 at 4:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

That's how setTimeout is by design. Javascript runs sequentially, and if it takes longer to complete a loop, well, then it takes longer to complete the loop.

Getting it consistent is merely a matter of performance in this case, and your code has a lot of cruft as-is. I annotated it with some performance improvements.

The reason it runs slow in Firefox is because of the console.log statement. Take that out and it will run a lot faster. console.log used to be slow in chrome, too, and I only have the dev version, but I think its long since been fixed. Any debugger running will be slower, that's normal.

function init() {
    // Never ever reference the DOM unless you absolutely have to
    // So we do it once, here, outside of the loop
    var canvas = document.getElementById('canvas');
    var ctx = canvas.getContext('2d');
    if (canvas.getContext) {
        setInterval(draw, 30, canvas, ctx);
    }
}

function draw(canvas, ctx) {

    timeNow = new Date().getTime();
    // console statements can be slow in some browsers, so make sure they're gone from the final product
    console.log('looptime: ' + (timeNow - startDrawTime));
    startDrawTime = new Date().getTime();

    triX = tri.pos.x;
    triY = tri.pos.y;
    // This clears the transformation matrix and resets the canvas
    canvas.width = canvas.width;

    ctx.save();
    ctx.translate(triX, triY);
    ctx.rotate(tri.orientation);

    ctx.beginPath();
    ctx.arc(0, 0, 5, 0, Math.PI * 2, true);
    ctx.stroke();
    ctx.restore();

    //draw tri
    ctx.beginPath();
    ctx.moveTo(0, 0);
    ctx.moveTo(0, -5);
    ctx.lineTo(5, 5);
    ctx.lineTo(-5, 5);
    // no need to close the path since we aren't stroking
    ctx.fill();
    //console.log('looptime: '+((new Date().getTime())-time));
}​
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Very helpful. –  RobotEyes Jun 30 '12 at 13:36
1  
Note, setInterval(draw(canvas, ctx), 30) will just call draw right then and there, and set up calls to draw's return value -- which isn't a function or string, so if it even manages to get by without a TypeError i'd be mighty surprised. Say setInterval(draw, 30, canvas, ctx) instead. And declare draw to take those args you're passing it. :P –  cHao Jul 2 '12 at 13:27
    
Whoops! This is why its nice to have complete code in jsfiddle! Otherwise I foul up providing answers by hand. Good eye! –  Simon Sarris Jul 2 '12 at 13:34
    
BTW, far as i can tell, console.log is faster in Chrome because it defers the actual logging. (There's issues because of that; for example, if you console.log an object and then immediately modify it, you'll often see the modified object in the log.) –  cHao Jul 2 '12 at 13:43
    
In chrome I've experienced that it's actually faster to append text to the dom than it is to log it to the console. –  Spoeken Jan 28 '13 at 13:26

Ok so theres a few things you can do to speed up performance. The first is cache your context. Put it in a variable outside of the draw function,

var ctx = document.getElementById('canvas').getContext('2d');

Then just reference ctx in the draw function. Otherwise you are searching the dom EVERY loop which can be expensive.

The next thing I recommend is using requestAnimationFrame over setTimeout

// requestAnim shim layer by Paul Irish
    window.requestAnimFrame = (function(){
      return  window.requestAnimationFrame       || 
              window.webkitRequestAnimationFrame || 
              window.mozRequestAnimationFrame    || 
              window.oRequestAnimationFrame      || 
              window.msRequestAnimationFrame     || 
              function(/* function */ callback, /* DOMElement */ element){
                window.setTimeout(callback, 1000 / 60);
              };
    })();

MDN source

Basically your browser controls when it needs to be repainted, giving you much smoother animations/movement. The above shim falls back to setTimeout where not supported, but since you are making a canvas game it should be supported regardless in the browsers you're using.

You would implement it like this

draw(){
    // All your other code etc..
    requestAnimFrame( function(){draw()} );
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I implemented your suggestions and it seems to be running smoothly at about a frame every 16ms. However, it's now worse in Firefox which has an even more erratic frame-rate from 1 to 220+ms. I've noticed it gets a lot worse when I open the fire-bug console or the chrome developer console. any suggestions? –  RobotEyes Jun 29 '12 at 22:18

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