Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What's a good no-op in T-SQL? I want to use it as a place-holder in boilerplate code snippets. For example, if I'm stubbing out a query/udf and have something like this:

IF @parm = 1
    BEGIN
    END
IF @parm = 2
    BEGIN
    END

...I'll get an Incorrect sytntax near the word 'END' message. What could I throw in between there that would silence the compiler (i.e., be executable)?

share|improve this question
1  
HOw about a print statement print @parm –  HLGEM Jun 29 '12 at 21:08
1  
possible duplicate of Empty statement in T-SQL –  Jon Egerton Jun 29 '12 at 21:23
1  
@Jon Egerton: Indeed, but I'm glad I missed it because @Abe's/@HLGEM's suggestion wasn't included there. (I suppose somebody ought to merge these two questions, but I'm not that meta.) –  kmote Jun 29 '12 at 22:35
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You could throw a print in there:

IF @parm = 1
    BEGIN
    print 'need to implement 1'
    END
IF @parm = 2
    BEGIN
    print 'need to implement 2'
    END
share|improve this answer
    
that'll work fine. Thanks! (And thanks to @HLGEM too for the same idea!) –  kmote Jun 29 '12 at 21:20
add comment

As mentioned here you could declare a dummy variable. It shouldn't appear anywhere at all (execution plans, printed output etc):

IF @parm = 1
    BEGIN
        DECLARE @dummy1 bit
    END
IF @parm = 2
    BEGIN
        DECLARE @dummy2 bit
    END

Alternatively, you can use a label too:

IF @parm = 1
    BEGIN
        noop1:
    END
IF @parm = 2
    BEGIN
        noop2:
    END
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the comment and the link! –  kmote Jun 29 '12 at 22:35
add comment

You could also try...

WAITFOR DELAY '0:0';
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.